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The economics and politics of output volatility: evidence from Indian states


  • Saibal Ghosh


Employing data for 1981--2009, this paper examines the factors influencing the volatility of state output, using India as a case study. The analysis appears to suggest that high income states exhibit relatively higher output volatility. At the state-level, the proximate determinants of a decline in output volatility can be traced to financial deepening, government expenditures and institutional quality. Also, state-level political factors are also found to play an important role. In addition, at the macroeconomic level, monetary policy considerations are observed to be the most important factor impacting output volatility.

Suggested Citation

  • Saibal Ghosh, 2013. "The economics and politics of output volatility: evidence from Indian states," International Review of Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 27(1), pages 110-134, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:irapec:v:27:y:2013:i:1:p:110-134
    DOI: 10.1080/02692171.2012.721753

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