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Industrial Collective Research Networks in Germany: Structure, Firm Involvement and Use of Results


  • Michael Rothgang
  • Matthias Peistrup
  • Bernhard Lageman


In Germany, industrial collective research (ICR) provides a unique framework for research collaborations: an industry-supported network of firms and research institutes conducts research for firms in low- and medium-technology branches. The research projects are mainly financed by a publicly funded program. Based on two surveys, one for research institutes and one addressing firm representatives, we analyze for the first time the institutional features and interactions in ICR. We ask how business firms are involved in network activities and how they benefit from the knowledge created. The results from research in ICR are usually relevant for several firms (e.g. results related to new norms and standards). The network also provides a framework for research on high-tech applications by enabling collaboration across different sectors and technology fields. ICR has proven rather successful in achieving the balancing act between aims of the network and diverging interests of the actors.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael Rothgang & Matthias Peistrup & Bernhard Lageman, 2011. "Industrial Collective Research Networks in Germany: Structure, Firm Involvement and Use of Results," Industry and Innovation, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 18(4), pages 393-414.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:indinn:v:18:y:2011:i:4:p:393-414 DOI: 10.1080/13662716.2011.573957

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Helbach, Christoph & Keldenich, Klemens & Rothgang, Michael & Yang, Guanzhong, 2012. "Call Me if You Can – An Experimental Investigation of Information Sharing in Knowledge Networks," Ruhr Economic Papers 332, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    2. repec:zbw:rwirep:0332 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Hancké, Bob & Coulter, Steve, 2013. "The German manufacturing sector unpacked: institutions, policies and future trajectories," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 56090, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    4. Santos, João M. & Horta, Hugo & Heitor, Manuel, 2016. "Too many PhDs? An invalid argument for countries developing their scientific and academic systems: The case of Portugal," Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Elsevier, vol. 113(PB), pages 352-362.
    5. Christoph Helbach & Klemens Keldenich & Michael Rothgang & Guanzhong Yang, 2012. "Call Me if You Can – An Experimental Investigation of Information Sharing in Knowledge Networks," Ruhr Economic Papers 0332, Rheinisch-Westfälisches Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, Universität Dortmund, Universität Duisburg-Essen.
    6. Michael Rothgang & Bernhard Lageman, 2011. "Innovationspolitischer Mehrwert durch Vernetzung?: Cluster- und Netzwerkförderung als Politikinstrument auf Bundes- und Länderebene," Vierteljahrshefte zur Wirtschaftsforschung / Quarterly Journal of Economic Research, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 80(3), pages 143-166.


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