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The Social Economics of Neoliberal Globalization

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  • James Stanfield
  • Michael Carroll

Abstract

The recent period of intensive and extensive development of global economic integration, or globalization, has reached a crossroads. The regime of the neoliberal Great Capitalist Restoration is not sustainable and fundamental governance changes must be made. This paper adds perspective to the choices that must be made at this critical juncture of the global social economy by applying the master concepts of Schumpeter’s Creative Destruction and Polanyi’s Protective Response.

Suggested Citation

  • James Stanfield & Michael Carroll, 2009. "The Social Economics of Neoliberal Globalization," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 38(1), pages 1-18, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:fosoec:v:38:y:2009:i:1:p:1-18
    DOI: 10.1007/s12143-008-9031-8
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Currie, Carolyn, 2005. "The need for a new theory of economic reform," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 425-443, August.
    2. Thomas I. Palley, 2013. "Financialization: What It Is and Why It Matters," Palgrave Macmillan Books, in: Financialization, chapter 2, pages 17-40, Palgrave Macmillan.
    3. Harvey, David, 2007. "A Brief History of Neoliberalism," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780199283279.
    4. John Tiemstra, 2007. "The Social Economics of Globalization," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 36(2), pages 143-159, January.
    5. Robert Pollin, 2000. "Anatomy of Clintonomics," Published Studies ps12, Political Economy Research Institute, University of Massachusetts at Amherst.
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    Cited by:

    1. Phillip O’Hara, 2011. "Stanfield’s Concepts of Social and Political Economy: Introduction to the Special Issue," Forum for Social Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(1), pages 1-5, January.
    2. Paolo Ramazzotti, 2016. "Themes in an institutionalist theory of economic policy," Working Papers 81-2016, Macerata University, Department of Finance and Economic Sciences, revised May 2016.

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