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A post-Keynesian regulatory model of privatization

Author

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  • AlHussaini, Wissam
  • Molz, Rick

Abstract

Many studies of privatization adopt the neo-liberal model which focuses on financial and economic distributional outcomes, and ignores social costs transferred to the state or broader society. We adopt a post-Keynesian point of view by identifying the social outcomes of privatization and the recipients of their effect in the society. We review regulation theory and discuss the effects of regulation on social and financial outcomes. Finally, we introduce a balanced regulatory model to show that privatization can become a process that achieves economic development and realizes broader social objectives.

Suggested Citation

  • AlHussaini, Wissam & Molz, Rick, 2009. "A post-Keynesian regulatory model of privatization," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 38(2), pages 391-398, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:soceco:v:38:y:2009:i:2:p:391-398
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Marangos, 2002. "A post Keynesian critique of privatization policies in transition economies," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 14(5), pages 573-589.
    2. Currie, Carolyn, 2005. "The need for a new theory of economic reform," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 34(4), pages 425-443, August.
    3. Baldwin, Robert & Cave, Martin & Lodge, Martin, 2011. "Understanding Regulation: Theory, Strategy, and Practice," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, edition 2, number 9780199576098.
    4. Birdsall, Nancy & Nellis, John, 2003. "Winners and Losers: Assessing the Distributional Impact of Privatization," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 31(10), pages 1617-1633, October.
    5. Carmen Pagés-Serra & James J. Heckman, 2000. "The Cost of Job Security Regulation: Evidence from Latin American Labor Markets," Research Department Publications 4227, Inter-American Development Bank, Research Department.
    6. Marangos, John, 2006. "Developing a civilised society in transition economies: The Post Keynesian paradigm," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 35(4), pages 660-681, August.
    7. Simoneti, Marko & Damijan, Joze P. & Rojec, Matija & Majcen, Boris, 2005. "Case-by-Case Versus mass privatization in transition economies: Initial owner and final seller effects on performance of firms in Slovenia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 33(10), pages 1603-1625, October.
    8. David S Saal & David Parker, 2000. "The impact of privatization and regulation on the water and sewerage industry in England and Wales: a translog cost function model," Managerial and Decision Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 21(6), pages 253-268.
    9. Omran, Mohammed, 2004. "The Performance of State-Owned Enterprises and Newly Privatized Firms: Does Privatization Really Matter?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 1019-1041, June.
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