IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/
MyIDEAS: Login to save this article or follow this journal

Keynes's Treatise : aggregate price theory for modern analysis?

  • Max Gillman

The paper explores the theory of the aggregate price, profit, and business fluctuations in Keyne's Treatise for its implications for modern macro-economic analysis. As in the Treatise, profits are first defined within a theory of the agregate price level, as aggregate investment minus saving. Deriving aggregate total revenue and aggregate total cost from this price theory, the paper shows how to construct a version of the Keynesian cross diagram. The cross construction suggests an important qualification for fiscal policy, that total cost does not shift. Then, using a neoclassical definition of profit and the total-cost / total-revenue approach, the paper derives aggregate supply, and then adds aggregate demand in an integrated framework. Comparative statics of the AS-AD analysis and the central role of profit in the Treatise suggest that a focus on profit might be useful in identifying exogenous technology shocks of real business cycle theory.

If you experience problems downloading a file, check if you have the proper application to view it first. In case of further problems read the IDEAS help page. Note that these files are not on the IDEAS site. Please be patient as the files may be large.

File URL: http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/abs/10.1080/09672560210149242
Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to look for a different version under "Related research" (further below) or search for a different version of it.

Article provided by Taylor & Francis Journals in its journal The European Journal of the History of Economic Thought.

Volume (Year): 9 (2002)
Issue (Month): 3 ()
Pages: 430-451

as
in new window

Handle: RePEc:taf:eujhet:v:9:y:2002:i:3:p:430-451
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.tandfonline.com/REJH20

Order Information: Web: http://www.tandfonline.com/pricing/journal/REJH20

References listed on IDEAS
Please report citation or reference errors to , or , if you are the registered author of the cited work, log in to your RePEc Author Service profile, click on "citations" and make appropriate adjustments.:

as in new window
  1. Neville, J. & Rao, B.B., 1991. "The Use and Abuse of Aggregate Demand and Supply Functions," Papers 91-16, New South Wales - School of Economics.
  2. William Darity, Jr. & Warren Young, 1995. "IS-LM: An Inquest," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 27(1), pages 1-41, Spring.
  3. repec:ltr:wpaper:1993.16 is not listed on IDEAS
  4. David Colander, 1995. "The Stories We Tell: A Reconsideration of AS/AD Analysis," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 9(3), pages 169-188, Summer.
  5. Mankiw, N Gregory, 1989. "Real Business Cycles: A New Keynesian Perspective," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 3(3), pages 79-90, Summer.
  6. Taylor, John B., 1993. "Discretion versus policy rules in practice," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 39(1), pages 195-214, December.
  7. Harberger, Arnold C, 1998. "A Vision of the Growth Process," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 88(1), pages 1-32, March.
  8. Daniel R. Fusfeld, 1985. "Keynes and the Keynesian cross: a note," History of Political Economy, Duke University Press, vol. 17(3), pages 385-389, Fall.
  9. John King, 1993. "Aggregate Supply and Demand Analysis Since Keynes: A Partial History," Working Papers 1993.16, School of Economics, La Trobe University.
  10. Topel, Robert H & Rosen, Sherwin, 1988. "Housing Investment in the United States," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 96(4), pages 718-40, August.
Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

This item is not listed on Wikipedia, on a reading list or among the top items on IDEAS.

When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:taf:eujhet:v:9:y:2002:i:3:p:430-451. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Michael McNulty)

If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

If references are entirely missing, you can add them using this form.

If the full references list an item that is present in RePEc, but the system did not link to it, you can help with this form.

If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

This information is provided to you by IDEAS at the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis using RePEc data.