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Banking efficiency and competition in low income countries: the case of Uganda


  • David Hauner
  • Shanaka Peiris


There is a concern that the state dominated, inefficient and fragile banking systems in many low-income countries, especially Sub-Saharan Africa, are a major hindrance to economic growth. In this context, this article systematically analyses the impact of the far-reaching banking sector reforms undertaken in Uganda on banking sector competition and efficiency. Using models of banking competition and efficiency that have been predominantly estimated in industrial countries, we find that the level of competition has significantly increased and has been associated with a rise in efficiency of the sector. Moreover, on average, larger banks and foreign-owned banks are more efficient than others while smaller banks have fallen back in efficiency with the increase in competitive pressures.

Suggested Citation

  • David Hauner & Shanaka Peiris, 2008. "Banking efficiency and competition in low income countries: the case of Uganda," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(21), pages 2703-2720.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:40:y:2008:i:21:p:2703-2720
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840600972456

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Romer, Paul M, 1986. "Increasing Returns and Long-run Growth," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1002-1037, October.
    2. N. Gregory Mankiw & David Romer & David N. Weil, 1992. "A Contribution to the Empirics of Economic Growth," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, Oxford University Press, vol. 107(2), pages 407-437.
    3. Lucas, Robert Jr., 1988. "On the mechanics of economic development," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 22(1), pages 3-42, July.
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    Cited by:

    1. Burki, Abid A. & Ahmad, Shabbir, 2010. "Bank governance changes in Pakistan: Is there a performance effect?," Journal of Economics and Business, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 129-146, March.
    2. Florian LEON, 2015. "What do we know about the role of bank competition in Africa?," Working Papers 201516, CERDI.
    3. Lucas Mataba & Jehovaness Aikaeli, 2016. "Empirical Analysis of Efficiency of Community Banks in Tanzania," International Journal of Economics and Finance, Canadian Center of Science and Education, vol. 8(12), pages 77-94, December.
    4. Su, Tong-Yaa, 2016. "Competition between Firms in Economic Evolution: Its Characteristics and Differences to the Biological Sphere," MPRA Paper 72756, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Martina Chinazom Okorie & David Onyinyechi Agu, 2015. "Does Banking Sector Reform Buy Efficiency Of Banking Sector Operations? ? Evidence from Recent Nigerias Banking Sector Reforms," Asian Economic and Financial Review, Asian Economic and Social Society, vol. 5(2), pages 264-278, February.

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