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An analysis of government expenditure and trade liberalization

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  • Sohrab Abizadeh

Abstract

The effect of trade liberalization on government's role in the economy is investigated. It is shown that, contrary to received expectations, as small open economies liberalize their trade, the size of government decreases.

Suggested Citation

  • Sohrab Abizadeh, 2005. "An analysis of government expenditure and trade liberalization," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 37(16), pages 1881-1884.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:v:37:y:2005:i:16:p:1881-1884
    DOI: 10.1080/00036840500173049
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Anisul Islam, 2001. "Wagner's law revisited: cointegration and exogeneity tests for the USA," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 8(8), pages 509-515.
    2. Dani Rodrik, 1998. "Why Do More Open Economies Have Bigger Governments?," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 106(5), pages 997-1032, October.
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    Cited by:

    1. Giuranno, Michele G. & Nocco, Antonella, 2020. "Trade tariff, wage gap and public spending," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 167-179.
    2. Estela Sáenz Rodríguez & Marcela Sabaté Sort & Mª. Dolores Gadea Rivas, 2011. "¿Condiciona la apertura exterior el tamaño del sector público? Un panorama," Hacienda Pública Española / Review of Public Economics, IEF, vol. 198(3), pages 131-149, September.
    3. Rangan Gupta & Lardo Stander & Andrea Vaona, 2017. "Openness and Growth: Is the Relationship Non-Linear?," Working Papers 201703, University of Pretoria, Department of Economics.
    4. Ahmad, Khalil & Ali, Amjad, 2019. "The Effect of Trade Liberalization on Expenditure Structure of Pakistan," MPRA Paper 95665, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Rene Cabral Torres, 2012. "Capital and Labor Mobility and the Size of Sub-national Governments: Evidence from a Panel of Mexican States," CID Working Papers 231, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    6. Mª Dolores Gadea Rivas & Marcela Sabaté Sort & Estela Sáenz Rodríguez, 2009. "The relationship between trade openness and public expenditure. The spanish case, 1960-2000," Documentos de Trabajo dt2009-06, Facultad de Ciencias Económicas y Empresariales, Universidad de Zaragoza.
    7. Muhammad Zakaria & Samreen Shakoor, 2011. "Relationship Between Government Size and Trade Openness: Evidence from Pakistan," Transition Studies Review, Springer;Central Eastern European University Network (CEEUN), vol. 18(2), pages 328-341, December.
    8. Estela Sáenz & Marcela Sabaté & M. Gadea, 2013. "Trade openness and public expenditure. The Spanish case, 1960–2000," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 154(3), pages 173-195, March.
    9. Yong-Yil Choi, 2010. "Relative government size in globalization and its welfare implications," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 42(11), pages 1447-1453.

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