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The effects of health aid on child health promotion in developing countries: cross-country evidence

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  • Simon Feeny
  • Bazoumana Ouattara

Abstract

Although epidemiological knowledge in relation to child health has improved in the last few decades, around 3 million children die each year in developing countries from preventable diseases. The international development community views increased immunization coverage for children as an important step in eliminating or reducing these deaths. Many developing countries have very limited resources to tackle major health problems and have to rely on external finance. This article examines the impact of foreign aid devoted to the health sector on child health promotion in developing countries. Two proxies for child health promotion are used: (a) immunization against measles and (b) immunization against Diphtheria--Pertussis--Tetanus (DPT). A range of model specifications and panel data econometric techniques are applied to data covering the period 1990 to 2005. This article finds a positive and statistically significant link between health aid and the measures of child health promotion.

Suggested Citation

  • Simon Feeny & Bazoumana Ouattara, 2013. "The effects of health aid on child health promotion in developing countries: cross-country evidence," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(7), pages 911-919, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:applec:45:y:2013:i:7:p:911-919
    DOI: 10.1080/00036846.2011.613779
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/00036846.2011.613779
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Raghuram G. Rajan & Arvind Subramanian, 2008. "Aid and Growth: What Does the Cross-Country Evidence Really Show?," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 90(4), pages 643-665, November.
    2. Boriana Yontcheva & Nadia Masud, 2005. "Does Foreign Aid Reduce Poverty? Empirical Evidence from Nongovernmental and Bilateral Aid," IMF Working Papers 05/100, International Monetary Fund.
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    Cited by:

    1. Han, Lu & Koenig-Archibugi, Mathias, 2015. "Aid Fragmentation or Aid Pluralism? The Effect of Multiple Donors on Child Survival in Developing Countries, 1990–2010," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 76(C), pages 344-358.
    2. Ziesemer, Thomas, 2012. "The impact of development aid on education and health: Survey and new evidence from dynamic models," MERIT Working Papers 057, United Nations University - Maastricht Economic and Social Research Institute on Innovation and Technology (MERIT).

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