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Modelling long-run money demand: a panel data analysis on nine developed economies

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  • Pasquale Foresti
  • Oreste Napolitano

Abstract

In this article, we investigate the presence of a long-run money demand in a selected group of nine developed OECD countries (G7 plus Australia and Switzerland). Our estimations are based on panel DOLS and between-dimension group-mean panel DOLS introduced by Mark and Sul (2003) and Pedroni (2001), respectively. We employ income and wealth as alternative scale variables to model two money demand functions using quarterly data for the period 1982 to 2008. Our results highlight the role of total wealth in the determination of money demand with a positive elasticity. Moreover, a parameter stability analysis suggests that estimated money demand with the inclusion of wealth is more stable.

Suggested Citation

  • Pasquale Foresti & Oreste Napolitano, 2013. "Modelling long-run money demand: a panel data analysis on nine developed economies," Applied Financial Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 23(22), pages 1707-1719, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apfiec:v:23:y:2013:i:22:p:1707-1719
    DOI: 10.1080/09603107.2013.848024
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1080/09603107.2013.848024
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:cml:moneta:v:iv:y:2016:i:1:p:121-152 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. César Carrera, 2016. "Long-run Money Demand in Latin American Countries: A Nonstationary Panel Data Approach," Monetaria, Centro de Estudios Monetarios Latinoamericanos, vol. 0(1), pages 121-152, January-j.
    3. Ralph Setzer & Guntram Wolff, 2013. "Money demand in the euro area: new insights from disaggregated data," International Economics and Economic Policy, Springer, vol. 10(2), pages 297-315, June.
    4. Sven Jari Stehn & Daniel Leigh, 2009. "Fiscal and Monetary Policy During Downturns; Evidence From the G7," IMF Working Papers 09/50, International Monetary Fund.
    5. de Bondt, Gabe, 2009. "Euro area money demand: empirical evidence on the role of equity and labour markets," Working Paper Series 1086, European Central Bank.
    6. Saten Kumar & Mamta B. Chowdhury & B. Bhaskara Rao, 2013. "Demand for money in the selected OECD countries: a time series panel data approach and structural breaks," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(14), pages 1767-1776, May.
    7. Rao, B. Bhaskara & Tamazian, Artur & Singh, Prakash, 2009. "Demand for Money in the Asian Countries: A Systems GMM Panel Data Approach and Structural Breaks," MPRA Paper 15030, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Greiber, Claus & Setzer, Ralph, 2007. "Money and housing: evidence for the euro area and the US," Discussion Paper Series 1: Economic Studies 2007,12, Deutsche Bundesbank.
    9. Philip Lowe & Claudio Borio, 2002. "Asset prices, financial and monetary stability: exploring the nexus," BIS Working Papers 114, Bank for International Settlements.
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    Cited by:

    1. Valentina-Ioana MERA, 2016. "Money Demand Features in CEE Countries," Informatica Economica, Academy of Economic Studies - Bucharest, Romania, vol. 20(4), pages 88-99.
    2. Vittorio Daniele & Pasquale Foresti & Oreste Napolitano, 2017. "The stability of money demand in the long-run: Italy 1861–2011," Cliometrica, Springer;Cliometric Society (Association Francaise de Cliométrie), vol. 11(2), pages 217-244, May.

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