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Non-linearities in the returns to education: sheepskin effects or threshold levels of human capital?

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  • Harry Anthony Patrinos

Abstract

Recent findings of non-linearities in the returns to education are cited as evidence of sheepskin effects, but evidence from Guatemala suggests otherwise. While non-linearities in the returns to education exist, it is argued that they are associated with 'threshold' levels.

Suggested Citation

  • Harry Anthony Patrinos, 1996. "Non-linearities in the returns to education: sheepskin effects or threshold levels of human capital?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 3(3), pages 171-173.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:3:y:1996:i:3:p:171-173
    DOI: 10.1080/135048596356609
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Lau, Lawrence J. & Jamison, Dean T. & Louat, Frederic F., 1991. "Education and productivity in developing countries : an aggregate production function approach," Policy Research Working Paper Series 612, The World Bank.
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    Cited by:

    1. Nakabayashi, Masaki, 2011. "Schooling, employer learning, and internal labor market effect: Wage dynamics and human capital investment in the Japanese steel industry, 1930-1960s," MPRA Paper 30597, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Jean-Louis ARCAND & Béatrice D'HOMBRES & Cl. PONDE AVENA, 2002. "Sheepskin Effects in the Returns to Education by Ethnic Group: Evidence from Northeastern Brazil," Working Papers 200226, CERDI.
    3. Aashish Mehta & Hector Villarreal, 2008. "Why do diplomas pay? An expanded Mincerian framework applied to Mexico," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 40(24), pages 3127-3144.
    4. Lin Xiu & Morley Gunderson, 2013. "Credential Effects and the Returns to Education in China," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 27(2), pages 225-248, June.
    5. Gibson, John & Fatai, Osaiasi Koliniusi, 2006. "Subsidies, selectivity and the returns to education in urban Papua New Guinea," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 25(2), pages 133-146, April.
    6. Savanti, Maria Paula & Patrinos, Harry Anthony, 2005. "Rising returns to schooling in Argentina, 1992-2002 : productivity or credentialism?," Policy Research Working Paper Series 3714, The World Bank.
    7. Alejos, Luis Alejandro, 2006. "La elección del sector laboral y los retornos a la educación en Guatemala
      [Labour Sector Choice and the Returns to Education in Guatemala]
      ," MPRA Paper 42756, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Empar Pons & Juan Blanco, 2005. "Sheepskin Effects in the Spanish Labour Market: A Public-Private Sector Analysis," Education Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 13(3), pages 331-347.
    9. repec:eee:injoed:v:60:y:2018:i:c:p:113-119 is not listed on IDEAS

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