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Is South Korea's stock market efficient? A note

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  • Abdul Rahman
  • Samir Saadi

Abstract

In an attempt to examine efficiency of South Korea's stock market (SKM), Narayan and Smyth (2004) used a battery of unit root tests to investigate the random walk hypothesis and on the basis of the reported evidence for unit root, they concluded that the SKM is efficient. The authors have unfortunately confused random walk with unit root hypothesis. The present note stresses the fact that it is insufficient to test for stationarity when examining efficiency, casting serious doubt on Narayan and Smyth's conclusions. Furthermore, we provide comments on the shortfalls of the unit roots tests employed and not accounted for in Narayan and Smyth's study which may lead to spurious results.

Suggested Citation

  • Abdul Rahman & Samir Saadi, 2007. "Is South Korea's stock market efficient? A note," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 14(1), pages 71-74.
  • Handle: RePEc:taf:apeclt:v:14:y:2007:i:1:p:71-74
    DOI: 10.1080/13504850500425659
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John Y. Campbell & Pierre Perron, 1991. "Pitfalls and Opportunities: What Macroeconomists Should Know About Unit Roots," NBER Chapters,in: NBER Macroeconomics Annual 1991, Volume 6, pages 141-220 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Russell Smyth, 2004. "Is South Korea's stock market efficient?," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 11(11), pages 707-710.
    3. Zivot, Eric & Andrews, Donald W K, 2002. "Further Evidence on the Great Crash, the Oil-Price Shock, and the Unit-Root Hypothesis," Journal of Business & Economic Statistics, American Statistical Association, vol. 20(1), pages 25-44, January.
    4. Lutz Kilian & Lee E. Ohanian, 1998. "Is there a trend break in U.S. GNP? A macroeconomic perspective," Staff Report 244, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis.
    5. Kim, Tae-Hwan & Leybourne, Stephen J & Newbold, Paul, 2000. " Spurious Rejections by Perron Tests in the Presence of a Break," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 62(3), pages 433-444, July.
    6. Brock, W.A. & Dechert, W.D. & LeBaron, B. & Scheinkman, J.A., 1995. "A Test for Independence Based on the Correlation Dimension," Working papers 9520, Wisconsin Madison - Social Systems.
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