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Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe

Author

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  • Duncan Gallie

    ()

  • Helen Russell

    ()

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Duncan Gallie & Helen Russell, 2009. "Work-Family Conflict and Working Conditions in Western Europe," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 93(3), pages 445-467, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:soinre:v:93:y:2009:i:3:p:445-467
    DOI: 10.1007/s11205-008-9435-0
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Francis Green, 1999. "It's been a hard day's night: The concentration and intensification of work in late 20th century Britain," Studies in Economics 9913, School of Economics, University of Kent.
    2. Michael White & Stephen Hill & Patrick McGovern & Colin Mills & Deborah Smeaton, 2003. "'High-performance' Management Practices, Working Hours and Work-Life Balance," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 41(2), pages 175-195, June.
    3. Gershuny, Jonathan, 2000. "Changing Times: Work and Leisure in Postindustrial Society," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198287872.
    4. Green, Francis & McIntosh, Steven, 2001. "The intensification of work in Europe," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 8(2), pages 291-308, May.
    5. Philippe Askenazy & Damien Cartron & Michel Gollac & Frédéric De Coninck, 2006. "Organisation et intensité du travail," Post-Print halshs-00754886, HAL.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1301-x is not listed on IDEAS
    2. AZMAN Ismail & NORHAFIZAH Abu Hasan & YU-FEI (Melissa) Chin & YUSOF Ismail & AINON JAUHARIAH Abu Samah, 2013. "Job Stress As A Predictor Of Employee Health," Studies in Business and Economics, Lucian Blaga University of Sibiu, Faculty of Economic Sciences, vol. 8(2), pages 20-34, Augus.
    3. Helen Russell & Frances McGinnity, 2014. "Under Pressure: The Impact of Recession on Employees in Ireland," British Journal of Industrial Relations, London School of Economics, vol. 52(2), pages 286-307, June.
    4. McGinnity F & Russell H, 2011. "Workplace Equality in the Recession? The Incidence and Impact of Equality Policies and Flexible Working," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT200.
    5. Cem Baslevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2012. "Do Preferences for Job Attributes Provide Evidence of 'Hierarchy of Needs'," Working Papers 201201, Murat Sertel Center for Advanced Economic Studies, Istanbul Bilgi University.
    6. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2013. "Do Preferences for Job Attributes Provide Evidence of ‘Hierarchy of Needs’?," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 111(2), pages 549-560, April.
    7. Henz, Ursula & Mills, Colin, 2015. "Work-life conflict in Britain: job demands and resources," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 60070, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    8. Cem Baslevent, 2014. "The Work-Life Conflict and Well-Being of Turkish Employees," Working Papers 827, Economic Research Forum, revised May 2014.
    9. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2014. "The Impact of Deviations from Desired Hours of Work on the Life Satisfaction of Employees," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 118(1), pages 33-43, August.
    10. repec:spr:soinre:v:132:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s11205-016-1344-z is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ilse Laurijssen & Ignace Glorieux, 2013. "Balancing Work and Family: A Panel Analysis of the Impact of Part-Time Work on the Experience of Time Pressure," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 112(1), pages 1-17, May.
    12. Russell, Helen & Maitre, Bertrand & Watson, Dorothy, 2015. "Trends and Patterns in Occupational Health and Safety in Ireland," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number RS40.
    13. Shazia Akhtar & M. Faisal Malik, 2016. "Effect of Boredom and Flexible Work Practices on the Relationship of WFC with Procrastination and Affective Commitment: Mediation of Non-Work-Related Presenteeism," Global Journal of Flexible Systems Management, Springer;Global Institute of Flexible Systems Management, vol. 17(4), pages 343-356, December.
    14. Cem Başlevent & Hasan Kirmanoğlu, 2017. "Gender Inequality in Europe and the Life Satisfaction of Working and Non-working Women," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 18(1), pages 107-124, February.
    15. Russell, Helen & McGinnity, Fran & Kingston, Gillian, 2014. "Gender and the Quality of Work: From Boom to Recession," Research Series, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI), number BKMNEXT264.

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