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Developing countries and international organizations: Introduction to the special issue

Author

Listed:
  • John W. McArthur

    () (Brookings Institution, Global Economy and Development Program)

  • Eric Werker

    () (Simon Fraser University)

Abstract

Abstract We describe four megatrends since the end of the Cold War that relate to developing countries: a greater share of the global economy; more accessible technologies, particularly in communication; breakthroughs in global cooperation in tackling basic human needs; and the evolution of a complex set of problems in spite of the progress. We then examine potential political economy channels that might hinder the ability of international organizations to adapt to the new realities. Introducing the articles to the special issue, we argue for four distinct variables that affect the behavior and character of international organizations: power, norms, preferences, and problems.

Suggested Citation

  • John W. McArthur & Eric Werker, 2016. "Developing countries and international organizations: Introduction to the special issue," The Review of International Organizations, Springer, vol. 11(2), pages 155-169, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:revint:v:11:y:2016:i:2:d:10.1007_s11558-016-9251-2
    DOI: 10.1007/s11558-016-9251-2
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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