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Taxing construction minerals: a contribution to a resource-efficient Europe

Author

Listed:
  • Bettina Bahn-Walkowiak
  • Raimund Bleischwitz
  • Martin Distelkamp
  • Mark Meyer

Abstract

This paper focuses on market incentives by the introduction of a construction minerals tax as an example of a resource tax. Currently, various European countries levy taxes or duties on primary construction materials, but a harmonisation of the taxation is not planned. Provided the tax rate has a perceptible price effect, the taxation of a resource can foster a demand management or the reduction of the raw material consumption and the governance of side and secondary effects. A construction minerals tax can target the stimulation of demand for secondary raw materials and recycled products, and—because the reuse of construction and demolition waste has technical limits—a stronger emphasis on the conservation of buildings and infrastructures. This has positive effects on the environment and the innovation efforts and it helps to internalise externalities. Germany, used as a case study in this paper, does not raise any taxes on other raw materials than energy sources at the federal level. For this reason, potential impacts of the introduction of a construction minerals tax will be explored and the results of a simulation will be provided. Copyright Springer-Verlag 2012

Suggested Citation

  • Bettina Bahn-Walkowiak & Raimund Bleischwitz & Martin Distelkamp & Mark Meyer, 2012. "Taxing construction minerals: a contribution to a resource-efficient Europe," Mineral Economics, Springer;Raw Materials Group (RMG);Luleå University of Technology, vol. 25(1), pages 29-43, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:minecn:v:25:y:2012:i:1:p:29-43
    DOI: 10.1007/s13563-012-0018-9
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Francesca Barigozzi & Bertrand Villeneuve, 2006. "The Signaling Effect of Tax Policy," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 8(4), pages 611-630, October.
    2. European Commission, 2010. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2010 edition," Taxation trends 2010, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    3. Bleischwitz, Raimund & Bahn-Walkowiak, Bettina & Irrek, Wolfgang & Schepelmann, Phillip & Schmidt-Bleek, Friedrich & Giljum, Stefan & Lutter, Stephan & Bohunovski, Lisa & Hinterberger, Friedrich & Haw, 2009. "Eco-Innovation - putting the EU on the path to a resource and energy efficient economy," Wuppertal Spezial, Wuppertal Institute for Climate, Environment and Energy, volume 38, number 38.
    4. European Commission, 2013. "Taxation trends in the European Union: 2013 edition," Taxation trends 2013, Directorate General Taxation and Customs Union, European Commission.
    5. Meyer, Bernd & Distelkamp, Martin & Wolter, Marc Ingo, 2007. "Material efficiency and economic-environmental sustainability. Results of simulations for Germany with the model PANTA RHEI," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 63(1), pages 192-200, June.
    6. David Popp, 2002. "Induced Innovation and Energy Prices," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(1), pages 160-180, March.
    7. Philippe Aghion & Reinhilde Veugelers & David Hemous, 2009. "No Green Growth Without Innovation," Policy Briefs 353, Bruegel.
    8. Gerber, Jean-David & Knoepfel, Peter & Nahrath, Stéphane & Varone, Frédéric, 2009. "Institutional Resource Regimes: Towards sustainability through the combination of property-rights theory and policy analysis," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 68(3), pages 798-809, January.
    9. repec:dau:papers:123456789/5402 is not listed on IDEAS
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    Cited by:

    1. Florian Flachenecker, 2015. "Sustainability, Resource Efficiency and Competitiveness. An Assessment of Resource Efficiency Policies in the European Union," Bruges European Economic Research Papers 32, European Economic Studies Department, College of Europe.
    2. David Font Vivanco & Serenella Sala & Will McDowall, 2018. "Roadmap to Rebound: How to Address Rebound Effects from Resource Efficiency Policy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 10(6), pages 1-17, June.
    3. Grit Ludwig, 2019. "The Role of Law in Transformative Environmental Policies—A Case Study of “Timber in Buildings Construction in Germany”," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 11(3), pages 1-14, February.
    4. Dominik Wiedenhofer & Marina Fischer-Kowalski, 2015. "Achieving Absolute Decoupling? Comparing Biophysical Scenarios and Macro-economic Modelling Results. WWWforEurope Working Paper No. 86," WIFO Studies, WIFO, number 57895, December.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Environmental taxes; Resource management; Economic incentives for innovation and efficiency; Simulation; H23 (externalities; environmental taxes and subsidies); O32 (management of technological innovation and R&D); Q32 (exhaustible resources and economic development); Q38 (government policy); E27 (forecasting and simulation: models and applications);
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • O32 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Management of Technological Innovation and R&D
    • Q32 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Exhaustible Resources and Economic Development
    • Q38 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Nonrenewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy (includes OPEC Policy)
    • E27 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Forecasting and Simulation: Models and Applications

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