IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/masfgc/v19y2014i6p715-731.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Migrants, land markets and carbon emissions in Jambi, Indonesia: Land tenure change and the prospect of emission reduction

Author

Listed:
  • Gamma Galudra

    ()

  • Meine Noordwijk
  • Putra Agung
  • Suyanto Suyanto
  • Ujjwal Pradhan

Abstract

Policies designed to reduce land-based carbon emissions require a good understanding of the complex connections between state-sanctioned concessions, forest conversion, informal land markets and migrants. Our case study in the peat forests of the Tanjung Jabung Barat (TanJaBar) regency of Jambi, Indonesia aimed to explore relations between four key stakeholder groups: the state, local communities, migrants, and state-sanctioned concessions. We hypothesized that current land use patterns are shaped by insecurity in formal forest tenure alongside informal land tenure arrangements with migrants. In analyzing the six two-way relationships between the four stakeholder groups, we found that interactions between the stakeholders have changed local norms and practice, causing land conflicts and contested claims that need to be explicitly addressed in efforts to reduce carbon emissions in TanJaBar. Relational concepts of land rights between migrants and local community leaders are informed by social identity, expectations of investment opportunities, insecure customary forest tenure and competing land use policies. Migrants act as intermediaries in shaping the land tenure system and shift the balance of power between local communities, the state, and business concessions. We conclude that effective and equitable implementation of national Reducing Emissions from Deforestation and Forest Degradation+ (REDD+) programs will need to recognize underlying land ownership dynamics, power struggles and strategic positioning among stakeholders across scales. Obtaining free and prior informed consent (FPIC) from all relevant stakeholders is a major challenge given this complexity. Low emission development strategies will require recognition of a reality beyond large-scale concessions and traditional local communities. Copyright The Author(s) 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Gamma Galudra & Meine Noordwijk & Putra Agung & Suyanto Suyanto & Ujjwal Pradhan, 2014. "Migrants, land markets and carbon emissions in Jambi, Indonesia: Land tenure change and the prospect of emission reduction," Mitigation and Adaptation Strategies for Global Change, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 715-731, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:19:y:2014:i:6:p:715-731
    DOI: 10.1007/s11027-013-9512-9
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11027-013-9512-9
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Rosyadi, Slamet & Birner, Regina & Zeller, Manfred, 2005. "Creating political capital to promote devolution in the forestry sector--a case study of the forest communities in Banyumas district, Central Java, Indonesia," Forest Policy and Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 213-226, February.
    2. Bebbington, Anthony & Dharmawan, Leni & Fahmi, Erwin & Guggenheim, Scott, 2006. "Local Capacity, Village Governance, and the Political Economy of Rural Development in Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1958-1976, November.
    3. Place, Frank & Otsuka, Keijiro, 2001. "Population, Tenure, and Natural Resource Management: The Case of Customary Land Area in Malawi," Journal of Environmental Economics and Management, Elsevier, vol. 41(1), pages 13-32, January.
    4. McCarthy, John F., 2004. "Changing to Gray: Decentralization and the Emergence of Volatile Socio-Legal Configurations in Central Kalimantan, Indonesia," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 32(7), pages 1199-1223, July.
    5. Andrew Wardell, D. & Lund, Christian, 2006. "Governing Access to Forests in Northern Ghana: Micro-Politics and the Rents of Non-Enforcement," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 34(11), pages 1887-1906, November.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:masfgc:v:19:y:2014:i:6:p:715-731. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.