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Isolation and technological innovation

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  • Peter Hall

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  • Robert Wylie

Abstract

Despite its importance as a formative influence in evolutionary biology, the notion of isolation has received relatively little attention in evolutionary economics and its application to technological innovation. This paper makes the case that isolation, in many guises, is a pervasive and permanent feature of the economic landscape and that its implications for technological innovation deserve further analysis. Isolation and potential implications for innovation are discussed in the early part of the paper and case studies of two military innovations are then used to illustrate the value of explicitly recognising various forms of isolation in explaining observed aspects of innovation process and outcomes. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 2014

Suggested Citation

  • Peter Hall & Robert Wylie, 2014. "Isolation and technological innovation," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(2), pages 357-376, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:24:y:2014:i:2:p:357-376
    DOI: 10.1007/s00191-014-0347-7
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s00191-014-0347-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Muhamed Kudic & Wilfried Ehrenfeld & Toralf Pusch, 2015. "On the trail of core–periphery patterns in innovation networks: measurements and new empirical findings from the German laser industry," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 55(1), pages 187-220, October.
    2. Kudic, Muhamed & Ehrenfeld, Wilfried & Pusch, Toralf, 2015. "Isolation and Innovation – Two Contradictory Concepts? Explorative Findings from the German Laser Industry," IWH Discussion Papers 1/2015, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    3. Areti Gkypali & Kostas Kounetas & Kostas Tsekouras, 2019. "European countries’ competitiveness and productive performance evolution: unraveling the complexity in a heterogeneity context," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 29(2), pages 665-695, April.

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    Keywords

    Isolation; Innovation; Evolution; Technology; Defence; O330;
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