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Knowledge, hierarchy and the selection of routines: an interpretative model with group interactions


  • Nathalie Lazaric


  • Alain Raybaut



The aim of this paper is to analyze the selection of routines inside an organizational structure characterized by different cognitive representations and facing hierarchical pressure leading to either truce or conflict. After a brief discussion of the role of hierarchy and the related problems of organizational practice selection in the evolutionary literature, we model the interactions between different groups within a firm trying to interfere with its coordination mechanisms in order to support their own practices. Numerical simulations highlight the different learning abilities present in various organizational set-ups and their related knowledge distribution. It is shown that networking designs are the most profitable organizational configurations because of their dynamics of learning, though they are very sensitive to the truce problem. Copyright Springer-Verlag Berlin/Heidelberg 2005

Suggested Citation

  • Nathalie Lazaric & Alain Raybaut, 2005. "Knowledge, hierarchy and the selection of routines: an interpretative model with group interactions," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 15(4), pages 393-421, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joevec:v:15:y:2005:i:4:p:393-421 DOI: 10.1007/s00191-005-0260-1

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Cosmides, Leda & Tooby, John, 1994. "Better than Rational: Evolutionary Psychology and the Invisible Hand," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(2), pages 327-332, May.
    2. Loasby, Brian J., 1998. "The organisation of capabilities," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 35(2), pages 139-160, April.
    3. Schlicht, Ekkehart, 1998. "On Custom in the Economy," OUP Catalogue, Oxford University Press, number 9780198292241, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Kurt Dopfer, 2011. "Mesoeconomics: A Unified Approach to Systems Complexity and Evolution," Chapters,in: Handbook on the Economic Complexity of Technological Change, chapter 13 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    2. Nathalie Lazaric & Alain Raybaut, 2014. "Do incentive systems spur work motivation of inventors in high tech firms? A group-based perspective," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 24(1), pages 135-157, January.
    3. Lazaric, Nathalie, 2011. "Organizational routines and cognition: an introduction to empirical and analytical contributions," Journal of Institutional Economics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(02), pages 147-156, June.
    4. Peter Moran & Michele Simoni & Gianluca Vagnani, 2011. "Becoming the best: by beating or ignoring the best? Toward an expanded view of the role of managerial selection in complex and turbulent environments," Journal of Management & Governance, Springer;Accademia Italiana di Economia Aziendale (AIDEA), vol. 15(3), pages 447-481, August.
    5. Nathalie Lazaric & Alain Raybaut, 2014. "Do incentive systems spur work motivations of inventors in high-tech firms," Post-Print halshs-00930186, HAL.
    6. Erbes, Analía & Tacsir, Ezequiel & Yoguel, Gabriel, 2008. "Endogenous competences and linkages development," MPRA Paper 20434, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    7. Nathalie Lazaric & Alain Raybaut, 2007. "Knowledge, Hierarchy and incentives: Why human resource policy and trust matter," Post-Print hal-00453292, HAL.
    8. Agnès Festré & Nathalie Lazaric, 2007. "Routines and leadership in Schumpeter and von Mises' analysis of economic change," Post-Print halshs-00271338, HAL.
    9. Martijn van der Steen, 2009. "Inertia and management accounting change: The role of ambiguity and contradiction between formal rules and routines," Accounting, Auditing & Accountability Journal, Emerald Group Publishing, vol. 22(5), pages 736-761, June.
    10. Kurt Dopfer, 2012. "The origins of meso economics," Journal of Evolutionary Economics, Springer, vol. 22(1), pages 133-160, January.

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    Hierarchy; Knowledge; Routines; Selection; Complexity;


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