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Nash Implementation in Production Economies

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  • Hong, Lu

Abstract

This paper provides a general way to incorporate private ownership production economies into the implementation of the Walrasian correspondence. We present two mechanisms, both of which permit agents to behave strategically with respect to their initial endowments, preferences, and production possibility sets. The first mechanism deals with the case of endowment destruction, the second deals with the case of endowment withholding. We show that each mechanism Nash implements the Walrasian correspondence. In addition, both mechanisms are individually feasible, balanced, continuous and only require the transmission of prices and quantities of goods as messages.

Suggested Citation

  • Hong, Lu, 1995. "Nash Implementation in Production Economies," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 5(3), pages 401-417, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:joecth:v:5:y:1995:i:3:p:401-17
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    Cited by:

    1. Tian, Guoqiang, 2005. "Implementation in production economies with increasing returns," Mathematical Social Sciences, Elsevier, vol. 49(3), pages 309-325, May.
    2. Tian, Guoqiang, 2009. "Implementation of Pareto efficient allocations," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 45(1-2), pages 113-123, January.
    3. Matthew O. Jackson, 2001. "A crash course in implementation theory," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, pages 655-708.
    4. Giraud, Gael & Rochon, Celine, 2002. "Consistent collusion-proofness and correlation in exchange economies," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 38(4), pages 441-463, December.
    5. Luis Corchón & Matteo Triossi, 2008. "Implementation with renegotiation when preferences and feasible sets are state dependent," Documentos de Trabajo 255, Centro de Economía Aplicada, Universidad de Chile.
    6. Akira Yamada & Naoki Yoshihara, 2007. "Triple implementation by sharing mechanisms in production economies with unequal labor skills," International Journal of Game Theory, Springer;Game Theory Society, pages 85-106.
    7. Kaplan, Todd R. & Wettstein, David, 1999. "Cost sharing: efficiency and implementation," Journal of Mathematical Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(4), pages 489-502, December.
    8. Maskin, Eric & Sjostrom, Tomas, 2002. "Implementation theory," Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare,in: K. J. Arrow & A. K. Sen & K. Suzumura (ed.), Handbook of Social Choice and Welfare, edition 1, volume 1, chapter 5, pages 237-288 Elsevier.
    9. Saijo, Tatsuyoshi & Tatamitani, Yoshikatsu & Yamato, Takehiko, 1996. "Toward Natural Implementation," International Economic Review, Department of Economics, University of Pennsylvania and Osaka University Institute of Social and Economic Research Association, vol. 37(4), pages 949-980, November.
    10. Hong, Lu, 1998. "Feasible Bayesian Implementation with State Dependent Feasible Sets," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 80(2), pages 201-221, June.
    11. Triossi, Matteo & Corchón Díaz, Luis Carlos, 2005. "Implementation with state dependent feasible sets and preferences: a renegotiation approach," UC3M Working papers. Economics we057136, Universidad Carlos III de Madrid. Departamento de Economía.
    12. Tian, Guoqiang, 2000. "Incentive Mechanism Design for Production Economies with Both Private and Public Ownerships," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 33(2), pages 294-320, November.
    13. Tian, Guoqiang, 2009. "Implementation in economies with non-convex production technologies unknown to the designer," Games and Economic Behavior, Elsevier, vol. 66(1), pages 526-545, May.
    14. Tian, Guoqiang, 2000. "Implementation of balanced linear cost share equilibrium solution in Nash and strong Nash equilibria," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, pages 239-261.
    15. Luis Corchón & Matteo Triossi, 2011. "Implementation with renegotiation when preferences and feasible sets are state dependent," Social Choice and Welfare, Springer;The Society for Social Choice and Welfare, vol. 36(2), pages 179-198, February.
    16. Tian, Guoqiang, 2002. "Implementation of Walrasian Allocations in Economies with Infinite Dimension Commodity Spaces," MPRA Paper 41228, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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