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Economics, Sociology, History: Notes on Their Loss of Unity, Their Need for Re-integration and the Current Relevance of the Controversy between Carl Menger and Gustav Schmoller

  • Dieter Bögenhold

    ()

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File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s12143-007-9005-2
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Article provided by Springer in its journal Forum for Social Economics.

Volume (Year): 37 (2008)
Issue (Month): 2 (August)
Pages: 85-101

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Handle: RePEc:spr:fosoec:v:37:y:2008:i:2:p:85-101
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.springer.com/economics/journal/12143

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  1. Veblen, Thorstein, 1909. "The Limitations of Marginal Utility," History of Economic Thought Articles, McMaster University Archive for the History of Economic Thought, vol. 17.
  2. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James Robinson, 2004. "Institutions as the Fundamental Cause of Long-Run Growth," NBER Working Papers 10481, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Fogel, Robert W, 1994. "Economic Growth, Population Theory, and Physiology: The Bearing of Long-Term Processes on the Making of Economic Policy," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(3), pages 369-95, June.
  4. Sen, Amartya, 1998. "The Possibility of Social Choice," Nobel Prize in Economics documents 1998-2, Nobel Prize Committee.
  5. Jean-Luc Demeulemeester & Claude Diebolt, 2007. "How much could economics gain from history: the contribution of cliometrics," Cliometrica, Journal of Historical Economics and Econometric History, Association Française de Cliométrie (AFC), vol. 1(1), pages 7-17, April.
  6. Thorstein Veblen, 1909. "The Limitations of Marginal Utility," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 17, pages 620.
  7. Richter, Rudolf, 2001. "New economic sociology and new institutional economics," MPRA Paper 4747, University Library of Munich, Germany.
  8. Daron Acemoglu & Simon Johnson & James A. Robinson, 2001. "Reversal of Fortune: Geography and Institutions in the Making of the Modern World Income Distribution," NBER Working Papers 8460, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  9. Douglass C North & John Joseph Wallis & Barry R. Weingast, 2006. "A Conceptual Framework for Interpreting Recorded Human History," NBER Working Papers 12795, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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