IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/demogr/v42y2005i3p447-468.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The impact of family structure transitions on youth achievement: Evidence from the children of the NlSY79

Author

Listed:
  • Alison Aughinbaugh

    ()

  • Charles Pierret
  • Donna Rothstein

Abstract

No abstract is available for this item.

Suggested Citation

  • Alison Aughinbaugh & Charles Pierret & Donna Rothstein, 2005. "The impact of family structure transitions on youth achievement: Evidence from the children of the NlSY79," Demography, Springer;Population Association of America (PAA), vol. 42(3), pages 447-468, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:42:y:2005:i:3:p:447-468
    DOI: 10.1353/dem.2005.0023
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1353/dem.2005.0023
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Janet Currie & Duncan Thomas, 1999. "Early Test Scores, Socioeconomic Status and Future Outcomes," NBER Working Papers 6943, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. Virginia W. Knox, 1996. "The Effects of Child Support Payments on Developmental Outcomes for Elementary School-Age Children," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 31(4), pages 816-840.
    3. Kevin Lang & Jay L. Zagorsky, 2001. "Does Growing up with a Parent Absent Really Hurt?," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 36(2), pages 253-273.
    4. Alison Aughinbaugh, 2004. "The Impact of Attrition on the Children of the NLSY79," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 39(2).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. DAVID M. BLAU & WILBERT van der KLAAUW, 2013. "What Determines Family Structure?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 51(1), pages 579-604, January.
    2. Hilke Brockmann, 2012. "Ungesunde Verhältnisse?: Eine Längsschnittanalyse zur Gesundheit von Kindern in zusammen- und getrenntlebenden Familien," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 503, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    3. Letizia Mencarini & Elena Meroni & Chiara Pronzato, 2011. "Leaving mum alone? The effect of parental divorce on children√≠s leaving home decisions," Working Papers 045, "Carlo F. Dondena" Centre for Research on Social Dynamics (DONDENA), Università Commerciale Luigi Bocconi.
    4. repec:spr:eurpop:v:33:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s10680-017-9424-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Shelly Lundberg & Robert A. Pollak & Jenna Stearns, 2016. "Family Inequality: Diverging Patterns in Marriage, Cohabitation, and Childbearing," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 79-102, Spring.
    6. Gottlieb, Aaron, 2016. "Household incarceration in early adolescence and risk of premarital first birth," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 61(C), pages 126-134.
    7. Chiara Pronzato & Arnstein Aassve, 2013. "Marital breakup and children's behavioural responses," CHILD Working Papers Series 12, Centre for Household, Income, Labour and Demographic Economics (CHILD) - CCA.
    8. Schmeer, Kammi, 2009. "Father absence due to migration and child illness in rural Mexico," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 69(8), pages 1281-1286, October.
    9. Ana Nuevo-Chiquero, 2012. "Trends in shotgun marriages: the pill, the will or the cost?," Working Papers 2012/21, Institut d'Economia de Barcelona (IEB).
    10. Frans Poppel & Niels Schenk & Ruben Gaalen, 2013. "Demographic Transitions and Changes in the Living Arrangements of Children: The Netherlands 1850–2010," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 32(2), pages 243-260, April.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:demogr:v:42:y:2005:i:3:p:447-468. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Rebekah McClure). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.