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The research productivity of black economists: A rejoinder

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  • Jacqueline Agesa
  • Maury Granger
  • Gregory Price

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Suggested Citation

  • Jacqueline Agesa & Maury Granger & Gregory Price, 2006. "The research productivity of black economists: A rejoinder," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 51-63, March.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:blkpoe:v:33:y:2006:i:3:p:51-63
    DOI: 10.1007/s12114-006-1004-7
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Augustin Fosu, 2006. "The research productivity of black economists: Ranking by individuals and doctoral alma mater—Comment," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 33(3), pages 45-49, March.
    2. Levin, Sharon G & Stephan, Paula E, 1991. "Research Productivity over the Life Cycle: Evidence for Academic Scientists," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 81(1), pages 114-132, March.
    3. Jacqueline Agesa & Maury Granger & Gregory Price, 2002. "The research productivity of black economists: Ranking by individuals and doctoral alma mater," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 30(2), pages 7-24, September.
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    Cited by:

    1. James Peoples, 2009. "Minorities’ Fields of Expertise in Economics and Employment Demand in These Fields," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 36(1), pages 1-6, March.
    2. Gregory Price, 2008. "NEA Presidential Address: Black Economists of the World You Cite!!," The Review of Black Political Economy, Springer;National Economic Association, vol. 35(1), pages 1-12, March.

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