IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/anresc/v61y2018i1d10.1007_s00168-017-0856-z.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Classifying vocational training markets

Author

Listed:
  • Corinna Kleinert

    () (Leibniz Institute for Educational Trajectories
    Institute for Employment Research
    University of Bamberg)

  • Alexander Vosseler

    (Siemens Bank GmbH)

  • Uwe Blien

    (Institute for Employment Research
    University of Bamberg)

Abstract

Abstract The German educational system is characterized by a large sector of dual vocational training, which facilitates integration into the labour market. This system creates a specific training market for school leavers, which is characterized by strong regional disparities. These differences as well as their consequences have not been systematically analysed in previous research. In a theory-guided analysis this paper examines empirically which structural ‘handicaps’ affect regional transition rates from school to training and how regional training markets may be classified according to these structural factors. To this end, a new method is applied which combines regression and cluster analysis to avoid arbitrariness in the selection of classification variables. It generates a well-interpretable classification of vocational education markets, which is of broad use in research and labour market policy. The method may be applied to solve a broad variety of similar research problems in regional science.

Suggested Citation

  • Corinna Kleinert & Alexander Vosseler & Uwe Blien, 2018. "Classifying vocational training markets," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 61(1), pages 31-48, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:61:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0856-z
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-017-0856-z
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://link.springer.com/10.1007/s00168-017-0856-z
    File Function: Abstract
    Download Restriction: Access to the full text of the articles in this series is restricted.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Scott Baum & Michele Haynes & Yolanda van Gellecum & Jung Hoon Han, 2007. "Considering regional socio-economic outcomes in non-metropolitan Australia: A typology building approach," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 86(2), pages 261-286, June.
    2. Franz Kronthaler, 2005. "Economic capability of East German regions: Results of a cluster analysis," Regional Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 39(6), pages 739-750.
    3. Acemoglu, Daron & Pischke, Jorn-Steffen, 1999. "Beyond Becker: Training in Imperfect Labour Markets," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 109(453), pages 112-142, February.
    4. Thomas J. Kane & Dietmar Harhoff, 1997. "Is the German apprenticeship system a panacea for the U.S. labor market?," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 10(2), pages 171-196.
    5. Schweri, Juerg & Mueller, Barbara, 2007. "Why has the share of training firms declined in Switzerland?," Zeitschrift für ArbeitsmarktForschung - Journal for Labour Market Research, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany], vol. 40(2/3), pages 149-167.
    6. Uwe Blien & Hermann Gartner & Heiko Stüber & Katja Wolf, 2009. "Regional price levels and the agglomeration wage differential in western Germany," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 43(1), pages 71-88, March.
    7. Lindley, Robert M, 1975. "The Demand for Apprentice Recruits by the Engineering Industry, 1951-71," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 22(1), pages 1-24, February.
    8. Regina Dionisius & Samuel Muehlemann & Harald Pfeifer & Günter Walden & Felix Wenzelmann & Stefan C. Wolter, 2009. "Costs and Benefits of Apprenticeship Training. A Comparison of Germany and Switzerland," Applied Economics Quarterly (formerly: Konjunkturpolitik), Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 55(1), pages 7-37.
    9. Charlie Karlsson & Michael Olsson, 2006. "The identification of functional regions: theory, methods, and applications," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 40(1), pages 1-18, March.
    10. Muehlemann, Samuel & Wolter, Stefan C., 2011. "Firm-sponsored training and poaching externalities in regional labor markets," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 41(6), pages 560-570.
    11. Björn Alecke & Timo Mitze & Gerhard Untiedt, 2013. "Growth effects of regional policy in Germany: results from a spatially augmented multiplicative interaction model," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 50(2), pages 535-554, April.
    12. Christine M. Aumayr, 2007. "European Region Types in EU-25," European Journal of Comparative Economics, Cattaneo University (LIUC), vol. 4(2), pages 109-147, September.
    13. Edwin Leuven, 2005. "The Economics of Private Sector Training: A Survey of the Literature," Journal of Economic Surveys, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 19(1), pages 91-111, February.
    14. Witten, Daniela M. & Tibshirani, Robert, 2010. "A Framework for Feature Selection in Clustering," Journal of the American Statistical Association, American Statistical Association, vol. 105(490), pages 713-726.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • I21 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Analysis of Education
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • R23 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Household Analysis - - - Regional Migration; Regional Labor Markets; Population

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:61:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00168-017-0856-z. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Sonal Shukla) or (Andrew Huffard) The email address of this maintainer does not seem to be valid anymore. Please ask Andrew Huffard to update the entry or send us the correct email address. General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.