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The impact of immigration on interregional migrations: an input–output analysis with an application for Spain

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  • Esteban Fernández Vázquez
  • Ana García Muñiz
  • Carmen Ramos Carvajal

Abstract

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Suggested Citation

  • Esteban Fernández Vázquez & Ana García Muñiz & Carmen Ramos Carvajal, 2011. "The impact of immigration on interregional migrations: an input–output analysis with an application for Spain," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 46(1), pages 189-204, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:anresc:v:46:y:2011:i:1:p:189-204
    DOI: 10.1007/s00168-009-0331-6
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John DiNardo & David Card, 2000. "Do Immigrant Inflows Lead to Native Outflows?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 90(2), pages 360-367, May.
    2. David Card, 2005. "Is the New Immigration Really so Bad?," Economic Journal, Royal Economic Society, vol. 115(507), pages 300-323, November.
    3. De New, John P & Zimmermann, Klaus F, 1994. "Native Wage Impacts of Foreign Labor: A Random Effects Panel Analysis," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 7(2), pages 177-192.
    4. Jean‐Michel Guldmann & Fahui Wang, 1998. "Population And Employment Density Functions Revisited: A Spatial Interaction Approach," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 77(2), pages 189-211, April.
    5. Jörn-Steffen Pischke & Johannes Velling, 1997. "Employment Effects Of Immigration To Germany: An Analysis Based On Local Labor Markets," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 79(4), pages 594-604, November.
    6. Rudolf Winter-Ebmer & Josef Zweimüller, 1999. "Do immigrants displace young native workers: The Austrian experience," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 12(2), pages 327-340.
    7. Robert J. LaLonde & Robert H. Topel, 1991. "Labor Market Adjustments to Increased Immigration," NBER Chapters, in: Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market, pages 167-199, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Abowd, John M. & Freeman, Richard B. (ed.), 1991. "Immigration, Trade, and the Labor Market," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, edition 1, number 9780226000954, January.
    9. Michael Batty, 1983. "Linear Urban Models," Papers in Regional Science, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 53(1), pages 5-25, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Cho, Cheol-Joo, 2017. "The displacement and attraction effects in interurban migration: An application of the input-output scheme to the case of large cities in Korea," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-49, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW Kiel).

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    C67; J61; R15;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • C67 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Mathematical Methods; Programming Models; Mathematical and Simulation Modeling - - - Input-Output Models
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • R15 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Econometric and Input-Output Models; Other Methods

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