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You can know your school and feed it too: Vermont farmers’ motivations and distribution practices in direct sales to school food services

Author

Listed:
  • David Conner
  • Benjamin King
  • Jane Kolodinsky

    ()

  • Erin Roche
  • Christopher Koliba
  • Amy Trubek

Abstract

Farm to School (FTS) programs are increasingly popular as methods to teach students about food, nutrition, and agriculture by connecting students with the sources of the food that they eat. They may also provide opportunity for farmers seeking to diversify market channels. Food service buyers in FTS programs often choose to procure food for school meals directly from farmers. The distribution practices required for such direct procurement often bring significant transaction costs for both school food service professionals and farmers. Analysis of data from a survey of Vermont farmers who sell directly to school food services explores farmers’ motivations and distribution practices in these partnerships. A two-step cluster analysis procedure characterizes farmers’ motivations along a continuum between market-based and socially embedded values. Further bivariate analysis shows that farmers who are motivated most by market-based values are significantly associated with distribution practices that facilitate sales to school food services. Implications for technical assistance to facilitate these sales are discussed. Copyright Springer Science+Business Media B.V. 2012

Suggested Citation

  • David Conner & Benjamin King & Jane Kolodinsky & Erin Roche & Christopher Koliba & Amy Trubek, 2012. "You can know your school and feed it too: Vermont farmers’ motivations and distribution practices in direct sales to school food services," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 29(3), pages 321-332, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:29:y:2012:i:3:p:321-332
    DOI: 10.1007/s10460-012-9357-y
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Jack Kloppenburg & Neva Hassanein, 2006. "From old school to reform school?," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 23(4), pages 417-421, December.
    2. Patricia Allen & Julie Guthman, 2006. "From “old school” to “farm-to-school”: Neoliberalization from the ground up," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 23(4), pages 401-415, December.
    3. Jessica Bagdonis & C. Hinrichs & Kai Schafft, 2009. "The emergence and framing of farm-to-school initiatives: civic engagement, health and local agriculture," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 26(1), pages 107-119, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Sarah Heiss & Noelle Sevoian & David Conner & Linda Berlin, 2015. "Farm to institution programs: organizing practices that enable and constrain Vermont’s alternative food supply chains," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 32(1), pages 87-97, March.
    2. repec:spr:agrhuv:v:34:y:2017:i:3:d:10.1007_s10460-016-9766-4 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Francesca Galli & Gianluca Brunori & Francesco Di Iacovo & Silvia Innocenti, 2014. "Co-Producing Sustainability: Involving Parents and Civil Society in the Governance of School Meal Services. A Case Study from Pisa, Italy," Sustainability, MDPI, Open Access Journal, vol. 6(4), pages 1-24, March.
    4. von Germeten, Jan-Paul & Hartmann, Monika, 2015. "What determines suppliers' intensity of participation in the EU School Fruit Scheme," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 211915, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Patrick Mundler & Sophie Laughrea, 2015. "Circuits alimentaires de proximité - Quels bénéfices pour le développement des territoires? Étude de cas dans trois territoires québécois," CIRANO Project Reports 2015rp-21, CIRANO.

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