IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/spr/agrhuv/v21y2004i4p387-397.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Farmer seed enterprises: A sustainable approach to seed delivery?

Author

Listed:
  • Soniia David

Abstract

A major reason for the low adoption of modern varieties of seed among small-scale farmers in developing countries is the inability of formal, centralized seed production systems to meet their complex and diverse seed requirements. Drawing on experiences in Uganda with the common bean, the paper proposes seed production by farmer seed enterprises (FSEs) as a strategy for meeting dual objectives: to sustainably distribute and promote modern crop varieties and to establish a regular source of “clean” seed of either local or modern varieties. It reports on lessons learned from the Ugandan experience and offers a conceptual framework and guidelines for establishing economically and institutionally sustainable FSEs. While FSEs offer a potentially sustainable solution to the problem of seed supply, the challenge of implementing and scaling up this approach in eastern and southern Africa remains formidable. Collaborative linkages need to be fostered between farmers, researchers, agro-enterprise specialists, NGOs, and the formal seed industry. Seed policy reforms need to be implemented and more client-oriented research systems must be institutionalized. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Suggested Citation

  • Soniia David, 2004. "Farmer seed enterprises: A sustainable approach to seed delivery?," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 21(4), pages 387-397, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:21:y:2004:i:4:p:387-397
    DOI: 10.1007/s10460-004-1247-5
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s10460-004-1247-5
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    File URL: https://libkey.io/10.1007/s10460-004-1247-5?utm_source=ideas
    LibKey link: if access is restricted and if your library uses this service, LibKey will redirect you to where you can use your library subscription to access this item
    ---><---

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wiggins, Steve & Cromwell, Elizabeth, 1995. "NGOs and seed provision to smallholders in developing countries," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 23(3), pages 413-422, March.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Ola Tveitereid Westengen & Kristine Skarbø & Teshome Hunduma Mulesa & Trygve Berg, 2018. "Access to genes: linkages between genebanks and farmers’ seed systems," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 10(1), pages 9-25, February.
    2. Nelson, Munyaka & Upenyu, Mazarura & Brighton, Mvumi, 2017. "A compelling case for seed enterprises as a tool for rural development in the smallholder farming sector," African Journal of Rural Development (AFJRD), AFrican Journal of Rural Development (AFJRD), vol. 2(2), June.
    3. Kanslime, Monica K. & Karanja, Daniel K. & Alokit, Christine & Ochieng, Justus, 2018. "Derived demand for African indigenous vegetable seed: implications for farmer-seed entrepreneurship development," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 21(6), July.
    4. Conny J. M. Almekinders & Steve Walsh & Kim S. Jacobsen & Jorge L. Andrade-Piedra & Margaret A. McEwan & Stef Haan & Lava Kumar & Charles Staver, 2019. "Why interventions in the seed systems of roots, tubers and bananas crops do not reach their full potential," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 11(1), pages 23-42, February.
    5. Shawn McGuire & Louise Sperling, 2016. "Seed systems smallholder farmers use," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 179-195, February.
    6. Nordhagen, Stella & Pascual, Unai, 2013. "The Impact of Climate Shocks on Seed Purchase Decisions in Malawi: Implications for Climate Change Adaptation," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 238-251.
    7. Narayan Khanal & Keshav Maharjan, 2014. "Factors influencing farmers’ behavior in rice seed selling in the market: a case study in the Tarai region of Nepal d," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-11, December.
    8. Rajendran, Srinivasulu & Afari-Sefa, Victor & Karanja, Daniel Kimani & Musebe, Richard & Romney, Dannie & Makaranga, Magesa A. & Samali, Silvest & Kessy, Radegunda Francis, 2016. "Farmer-Led Seed Enterprise Initiatives to Access Certified Seed for Traditional African Vegetables and its Effect on Incomes in Tanzania," International Food and Agribusiness Management Review, International Food and Agribusiness Management Association, vol. 19(1), pages 1-24, February.
    9. Shawn McGuire & Louise Sperling, 2016. "Seed systems smallholder farmers use," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 8(1), pages 179-195, February.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Tripp, Robert & Rohrbach, David, 2001. "Policies for African seed enterprise development," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 26(2), pages 147-161, April.
    2. J.P.B. Lillesø & C. Harwood & Abayneh Derero & L. Graudal & J. M. Roshetko & R. Kindt & S. Moestrup & W. O. Omondi & N. Holtne & A. Mbora & P. van Breugel & I. K. Dawson & R. Jamnadass & H. Egelyng, 2018. "Why institutional environments for agroforestry seed systems matter," Development Policy Review, Overseas Development Institute, vol. 36(S1), pages 89-112, March.
    3. Thiele, Graham, 1999. "Informal potato seed systems in the Andes: Why are they important and what should we do with them?," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 27(1), pages 83-99, January.
    4. Maredia, Mywish K. & Shupp, Robert & Opoku, Edward & Mishili, Fulgence & Reyes, Bryon & Kusolwa, Paul & Kusi, Francis & Kudra, Abdul, 2018. "Do Farmers Value Seeds of Different Quality Differently? Evidence from Willingness to Pay Experiments in Tanzania and Ghana," Food Security International Development Working Papers 270988, Michigan State University, Department of Agricultural, Food, and Resource Economics.
    5. Tripp, Robert & Louwaars, Niels, 1997. "Seed regulation: choices on the road to reform," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 22(5), pages 433-446, October.
    6. S. Akbar Zaidi, 1999. "NGO failure and the need to bring back the state," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 11(2), pages 259-271.
    7. Narayan Khanal & Keshav Maharjan, 2014. "Factors influencing farmers’ behavior in rice seed selling in the market: a case study in the Tarai region of Nepal d," Agricultural and Food Economics, Springer;Italian Society of Agricultural Economics (SIDEA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-11, December.
    8. L. Jamila Haider & Wiebren J. Boonstra & Anzurat Akobirshoeva & Maja Schlüter, 2020. "Effects of development interventions on biocultural diversity: a case study from the Pamir Mountains," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 37(3), pages 683-697, September.
    9. Tripp, Robert & Pal, Suresh, 2001. "The Private Delivery of Public Crop Varieties: Rice in Andhra Pradesh," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 103-117, January.

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:spr:agrhuv:v:21:y:2004:i:4:p:387-397. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Sonal Shukla or Springer Nature Abstracting and Indexing (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.springer.com .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.