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Seed provision and dryland crops in the semiarid regions of Eastern Kenya:

Author

Listed:
  • Nagarajan, Latha
  • Audi, Patrick
  • Jones, Richard
  • Smale, Melinda

Abstract

"Over the last two decades, several seed-related programs have been initiated in eastern Kenya to improve farmers' access to quality seeds of dryland cereals and legumes. They are provided during two occasions, regular and emergency times. But very often, the formal supply mechanisms limit their role in provision of seeds other than maize. In the absence of any formalized systems of seed provision for other dryland crops, such as sorghum and pigeon pea, farmers have preferred local markets for their seed needs, especially during distress periods. Here we have examined the role of various seed-intervention programs in eastern Kenya, along with the strengths and weaknesses of each program. We have also underscored the importance of local markets and their actors in meeting the needs for non-maize and bean seeds in these marginal environments. For this purpose, detailed, informal interviews were conducted during October–December 2005 with all the stakeholders, namely public and private institutions and vendors in eight major local markets in eastern Kenya. The results of the study call for synergies between existing formal (private, public, and other development initiative) systems and informal (local market) seed systems to enhance crop yields and the diversity of dryland cereals and legumes through effective seed-supply interventions." from Author's Abstract

Suggested Citation

  • Nagarajan, Latha & Audi, Patrick & Jones, Richard & Smale, Melinda, 2007. "Seed provision and dryland crops in the semiarid regions of Eastern Kenya:," IFPRI discussion papers 738, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
  • Handle: RePEc:fpr:ifprid:738
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    File URL: http://www.ifpri.org/sites/default/files/publications/ifpridp00738.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Soniia David & Louise Sperling, 1999. "Improving technology delivery mechanisms: Lessons from bean seed systems research in eastern and central Africa," Agriculture and Human Values, Springer;The Agriculture, Food, & Human Values Society (AFHVS), vol. 16(4), pages 381-388, December.
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    Cited by:

    1. Takeshima, Hiroyuki & Oyekale, Abayomi & Olatokun, Segun & Salau, Sheu, 2010. "Demand characteristics for improved rice, cowpea, and maize seeds in Nigeria: Policy implications and knowledge gaps," NSSP working papers 16, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    2. Backson Mwangi & Ibrahim Macharia & Eric Bett, 2021. "Ex-post Impact Evaluation of Improved Sorghum Varieties on Poverty Reduction in Kenya: A Counterfactual Analysis," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 154(2), pages 447-467, April.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Seed interventions; Local markets; Seed systems; Dry lands; Seed access; Eastern Kenya;
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