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Interleague Play and Baseball Attendance

Author

Listed:
  • Michael R. Butler

    (Texas Christian University)

Abstract

The effects of interleague play on baseball attendance are estimated via a model of daily attendance from the 1999 season. The results suggest that interleague play results in about a 7% increase in attendance over a comparable intraleague game, yielding an increase in revenue from ticket sales of about one half of 1%. These results are heavily dominated by a relatively small number of attractive visiting teams and, more particularly, by a small number of attractive interleague matchups. Although fans respond positively to some interleague match-ups, many others attract no more and sometimes even fewer fans than traditional intraleague games.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael R. Butler, 2002. "Interleague Play and Baseball Attendance," Journal of Sports Economics, , vol. 3(4), pages 320-334, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:jospec:v:3:y:2002:i:4:p:320-334
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    File URL: http://jse.sagepub.com/content/3/4/320.abstract
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Daniel A. Rascher & John Paul G. Solmes, 2007. "Do Fans Want Close Contests? A Test of the Uncertainty of Outcome Hypothesis in the National Basketball Association," International Journal of Sport Finance, Fitness Information Technology, vol. 2(3), pages 130-141, August.
    2. Rodney J. Paul & Andrew P. Weinbach, 2011. "Minor League Baseball Attendance in the Pacific Northwest: A Study of the Effects of Winning, Scoring, Demographics and Promotions in the Northwest and Pioneer Baseball Leagues," Ekonomika a Management, University of Economics, Prague, vol. 2011(2).
    3. Rodney J. Paul & Andrew P. Weinbach, 2013. "The Yankee Effect in Minor League Baseball," New York Economic Review, New York State Economics Association (NYSEA), pages 32-42.
    4. Brian Volz, 2009. "The Interleague Advantage: A Difference in Differences Analysis," Working papers 2009-32, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    5. Tyler Anthony & Tim Kahn & Briana Madison & Rodney Paul & Andrew Weinbach, 2014. "Similarities in fan preferences for minor-league baseball across the American Southeast," Journal of Economics and Finance, Springer;Academy of Economics and Finance, vol. 38(1), pages 150-163, January.
    6. Budzinski, Oliver & Feddersen, Arne, 2015. "Grundlagen der Sportnachfrage: Theorie und Empirie der Einflussfaktoren auf die Zuschauernachfrage," Ilmenau Economics Discussion Papers 94, Ilmenau University of Technology, Institute of Economics.
    7. repec:bla:jrinsu:v:83:y:2016:i:4:p:877-912 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. John C. Whitehead & Bruce K. Johnson & Daniel S. Mason & Gordon J. Walker, 2009. "Using Revealed and Stated Preference Data to Estimate the Demand and Consumption Benefits of Sporting Events: An Application to National Hockey League Game Trips," Working Papers 09-13, Department of Economics, Appalachian State University.
    9. D Forrest & R Simmons, 2005. "New issues in attendance demand: the case of the English football league," Working Papers 563356, Lancaster University Management School, Economics Department.
    10. Scott Tainsky & Jie Xu & Brian Mills & Steven Salaga, 2016. "How Success and Uncertainty Compel Interest in Related Goods: Playoff Probability and Out-of-Market Television Viewership in the National Football League," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 48(1), pages 29-43, February.
    11. repec:lan:wpaper:3604 is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Stephan Lenor & Liam J. A. Lenten & Jordi McKenzie, 2016. "Rivalry Effects and Unbalanced Schedule Optimisation in the Australian Football League," Review of Industrial Organization, Springer;The Industrial Organization Society, vol. 49(1), pages 43-69, August.
    13. Brian Mills & Rodney Fort, 2014. "League-Level Attendance And Outcome Uncertainty In U.S. Pro Sports Leagues," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 52(1), pages 205-218, January.
    14. repec:lan:wpaper:3710 is not listed on IDEAS
    15. repec:lan:wpaper:3995 is not listed on IDEAS
    16. Lenten, Liam J.A., 2011. "The extent to which unbalanced schedules cause distortions in sports league tables," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 28(1-2), pages 451-458, January.
    17. Yamamura, Eiji & Shin, Inyong, 2008. "The influence of a leader and social interaction on attendance: The case of the Japanese professional baseball league, 1952-2003," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 37(4), pages 1412-1426, August.
    18. repec:lan:wpaper:3602 is not listed on IDEAS

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