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Non-state actors in civil wars: A new dataset

Author

Listed:
  • David E. Cunningham

    (University of Maryland, USA and Peace Research Institute Oslo, Norway)

  • Kristian Skrede Gleditsch

    (University of Essex, UK and Peace Research Institute Oslo, Norway)

  • Idean Salehyan

    (University of North Texas, USA)

Abstract

This paper introduces the Non-State Actors in Armed Conflict Dataset (NSA), which contains detailed information on the state–rebel group dyads included in the Uppsala Conflict Data Project Dyadic Dataset. Existing quantitative studies generally focus on characteristics of countries and conflicts to examine the duration, severity, outcome and recurrence of civil wars, in ways that often ignore the actors in civil wars. The NSA data provides additional information on the organizations involved in conflict dynamics. We describe the structure of the NSA data and the variables included, provide descriptive statistics of the indicators, and discuss areas for future research on non-state actors to enhance our understanding of conflict processes.

Suggested Citation

  • David E. Cunningham & Kristian Skrede Gleditsch & Idean Salehyan, 2013. "Non-state actors in civil wars: A new dataset," Conflict Management and Peace Science, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 30(5), pages 516-531, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:compsc:v:30:y:2013:i:5:p:516-531
    DOI: 10.1177/0738894213499673
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Fearon, James D. & Laitin, David D., 2003. "Ethnicity, Insurgency, and Civil War," American Political Science Review, Cambridge University Press, vol. 97(1), pages 75-90, February.
    2. Salehyan, Idean & Gleditsch, Kristian Skrede & Cunningham, David E., 2011. "Explaining External Support for Insurgent Groups," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 65(4), pages 709-744, October.
    3. Salehyan, Idean & Gleditsch, Kristian Skrede, 2006. "Refugees and the Spread of Civil War," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 60(2), pages 335-366, April.
    4. Macartan Humphreys & Jeremy M. Weinstein, 2008. "Who Fights? The Determinants of Participation in Civil War," American Journal of Political Science, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 52(2), pages 436-455, April.
    5. David E. Cunningham, 2006. "Veto Players and Civil War Duration," American Journal of Political Science, John Wiley & Sons, vol. 50(4), pages 875-892, October.
    6. Nilsson, Desiree, 2008. "Partial peace rebel groups inside and outside civil war settlements," Policy Research Working Paper Series 4572, The World Bank.
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    8. Kydd, Andrew & Walter, Barbara F., 2002. "Sabotaging the Peace: The Politics of Extremist Violence," International Organization, Cambridge University Press, vol. 56(2), pages 263-296, April.
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    Cited by:

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    2. Wakako Maekawa & Barış Arı & Theodora-Ismene Gizelis, 2019. "UN involvement and civil war peace agreement implementation," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 178(3), pages 397-416, March.
    3. Haass, Felix & Ottmann, Martin, 2017. "Profits from Peace: The Political Economy of Power-Sharing and Corruption," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 99(C), pages 60-74.

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