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Testing Limited Arbitrage: The Case of the Tunisian Stock Market

Author

Listed:
  • Salem Brahim
  • Kamel Naoui
  • Akrem brahim

Abstract

This paper aims at showing that arbitrage, theoretically used as a mechanism of establishing equilibrium in financial markets, is limited in reality. Because of numerous obstacles and risks to arbitrage, assets prices become more and more biased and exhibit numerous anomalies. Like Lam and Wei (2011), in our study we show that arbitrage is limited. To this end, we use a sample of 20 firms listed on the Tunis Stock Exchange (TSE) over a period stretching from July 2007 to June 2012. The results indicate that arbitrage is limited and does not play a fundamental role in stabilizing prices.

Suggested Citation

  • Salem Brahim & Kamel Naoui & Akrem brahim, 2014. "Testing Limited Arbitrage: The Case of the Tunisian Stock Market," International Journal of Empirical Finance, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 2(2), pages 65-74.
  • Handle: RePEc:rss:jnljef:v2i2p2
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    3. repec:hrv:faseco:33077905 is not listed on IDEAS
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