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Competitive analysis of economic development of Serbia and EU depending on the possibility of using strategy Europe: 2020 in Serbia

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  • Srdjana Dragomirovic

    (Faculty of Economics - Nis, Republic of Serbia)

Abstract

In March 2012, Serbia received the status of candidate for EU membership. However, Serbia is not prepared for the memberships of this organization even though there have happened huge structural changes in the national economy of Serbia. On the other hand, the European Union has taken a new strategy of development, Europe: 2020, which includes smart, sustainable and inclusive growth. This work will draw attention on the achieved economic development of Serbia, through the competitive analysis of economic development of Serbia and EU-27. In that case, it will be analyzing some indicators of four groups of indicators of economic development: quantitatively expressed indicators of economic development, economic and social indicators of economic development, scientific and technological as well as value expressed indicators of economic development. The quantitatively expressed indicators of economic development will be used in case of overview achieved level of industrial and agriculture development. The subjects of this analysis will cover the level of production of some of the food and industrial products. Economic and social indicators will indicate the level of 'quality of life' in Serbia, compared with EU-27. Scientific and technological as well as value expressed indicators of economic development will show the condition of national economy. All of the four groups of indicators will point out the level of economic development which Serbia deals with. The final part of this paper will show the level of inconsistency of economic development of Serbia compared with the European Union. Finally, this work will indicate if Serbia can implement strategy Europe: 2020 in the national economy of the country and if it can, if Serbia gets all assumption for European integration.

Suggested Citation

  • Srdjana Dragomirovic, 2012. "Competitive analysis of economic development of Serbia and EU depending on the possibility of using strategy Europe: 2020 in Serbia," Review of Applied Socio-Economic Research, Pro Global Science Association, vol. 4(2), pages 79-86, Decembre.
  • Handle: RePEc:rse:wpaper:v:4:y:2012:i:2:p:79-86
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Broadberry,Stephen & O'Rourke,Kevin H., 2010. "The Cambridge Economic History of Modern Europe," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521882033, October.
    2. Raj Nallari & Breda Griffith, 2011. "Understanding Growth and Poverty : Theory, Policy, and Empirics," World Bank Publications, The World Bank, number 2281, July.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    economic development; strategy Europe: 2020; European integration.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O10 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - General

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