IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/rre/publsh/v20y1990i1p10-20.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The Effect of Residential Location on the Probability of Black and White Teenagers Having a Job

Author

Listed:
  • Keith R. Ihlanfeldt

    (Georgia State University)

  • Davil L. Sjoquist

    (Georgia State University)

Abstract

The evidence presented here suggests that residential location has a strong impact on both white and black youth job probability. These results were obtained by estimating a multinomial logit model, which recognizes the joint endogeneity of employment and school enrollment, with data from the Chicago metropolitan area. Furthermore, according to our results, at a minimum, about a fifth of the black/white employment rate differential among Chicago's youth can be attributed to residential segregation.

Suggested Citation

  • Keith R. Ihlanfeldt & Davil L. Sjoquist, 1990. "The Effect of Residential Location on the Probability of Black and White Teenagers Having a Job," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 20(1), pages 10-20, Winter.
  • Handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v20:y:1990:i:1:p:10-20
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/view/20.1.2/pdf/
    File Function: To View On Journal Page
    Download Restriction: no

    File URL: http://journal.srsa.org/ojs/index.php/RRS/article/download/20.1.2/pdf/
    File Function: To Download Article
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Maddala,G. S., 1986. "Limited-Dependent and Qualitative Variables in Econometrics," Cambridge Books, Cambridge University Press, number 9780521338257, November.
    2. David T. Ellwood, 1986. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: Are There Teenage Jobs Missing in the Ghetto?," NBER Chapters, in: The Black Youth Employment Crisis, pages 147-190, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Richard B. Freeman & Harry J. Holzer, 1986. "The Black Youth Employment Crisis," NBER Books, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc, number free86-1, October.
    4. Reid, Clifford E., 1985. "The effect of residential location on the wages of black women and white women," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 18(3), pages 350-363, November.
    5. Vrooman, John & Greenfield, Stuart, 1980. "Are blacks making it in the suburbs? Some new evidence on intrametropolitan spatial segmentation," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 7(2), pages 155-167, March.
    6. Freeman, Richard B. & Holzer, Harry J. (ed.), 1986. "The Black Youth Employment Crisis," National Bureau of Economic Research Books, University of Chicago Press, number 9780226261645, January.
    7. John F. Kain, 1968. "Housing Segregation, Negro Employment, and Metropolitan Decentralization," The Quarterly Journal of Economics, President and Fellows of Harvard College, vol. 82(2), pages 175-197.
    8. Ronald G. Ehrenberg & Alan J. Marcus, 1982. "Minimum Wages and Teenagers' Enrollment-Employment Outcomes: A Multinomial Logit Model," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 39-58.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Shengyi Gao & Patricia Mokhtarian & Robert Johnston, 2008. "Exploring the connections among job accessibility, employment, income, and auto ownership using structural equation modeling," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 42(2), pages 341-356, June.
    2. Stoll, Michael A., 1999. "Spatial Job Search, Spatial Mismatch, and the Employment and Wages of Racial and Ethnic Groups in Los Angeles," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 46(1), pages 129-155, July.
    3. John F. Kain, 2004. "A Pioneer's Perspective on the Spatial Mismatch Literature," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 41(1), pages 7-32, January.
    4. John Östh, 2011. "Introducing a Method for the Computation of Doubly Constrained Accessibility Models in Larger Datasets," Networks and Spatial Economics, Springer, vol. 11(4), pages 581-620, December.

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Pinto, Santiago M., 2002. "Residential Choice, Mobility, and the Labor Market," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 51(3), pages 469-496, May.
    2. Keith R. Ihlanfeldt & David L. Sjoquist, 1991. "The Effect of Job Access on Black and White Youth Employment: A Cross-sectional Analysis," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 28(2), pages 255-265, April.
    3. H Bauder & E Perle, 1999. "Spatial and Skills Mismatch for Labor-Market Segments," Environment and Planning A, , vol. 31(6), pages 959-977, June.
    4. Edward A. Fieldhouse, 1999. "Ethnic Minority Unemployment and Spatial Mismatch: The Case of London," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 36(9), pages 1569-1596, August.
    5. Jangik Jin & Kurt Paulsen, 2018. "Does accessibility matter? Understanding the effect of job accessibility on labour market outcomes," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 55(1), pages 91-115, January.
    6. Shengyi Gao & Patricia Mokhtarian & Robert Johnston, 2008. "Exploring the connections among job accessibility, employment, income, and auto ownership using structural equation modeling," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 42(2), pages 341-356, June.
    7. Justin Tyndall, 2017. "Waiting for the R train: Public transportation and employment," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 54(2), pages 520-537, February.
    8. Jeffrey R. Kling & Jeffrey B. Liebman & Lawrence F. Katz & Lisa Sanbonmatsu, 2004. "Moving to Opportunity and Tranquility: Neighborhood Effects on Adult Economic Self-Sufficiency and Health From a Randomized Housing Voucher Experiment," Working Papers 5, Princeton University, Department of Economics, Industrial Relations Section..
    9. Valerie Preston & Sara McLafferty, 1999. "articles: Spatial mismatch research in the 1990s: progress and potential," Papers in Regional Science, Springer;Regional Science Association International, vol. 78(4), pages 387-402.
    10. Hellerstein, Judith K. & Neumark, David & McInerney, Melissa, 2008. "Spatial mismatch or racial mismatch?," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(2), pages 464-479, September.
    11. Weinberg, Bruce A., 2000. "Black Residential Centralization and the Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis," Journal of Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 48(1), pages 110-134, July.
    12. Judith K. Hellerstein & David Neumark, 2011. "Employment in Black Urban Labor Markets: Problems and Solutions," NBER Working Papers 16986, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Brueckner, Jan K. & Martin, Richard W., 1997. "Spatial mismatch: An equilibrium analysis," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 27(6), pages 693-714, November.
    14. Gary Painter & Cathy Yang Liu & Duan Zhuang, 2007. "Immigrants and the Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: Employment Outcomes among Immigrant Youth in Los Angeles," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 44(13), pages 2627-2649, December.
    15. Judith K. Hellerstein & Melissa Mcinerney & David Neumark, 2010. "Spatial Mismatch, Immigrant Networks, and Hispanic Employment in the United States," Annals of Economics and Statistics, GENES, issue 99-100, pages 141-167.
    16. Lingqian Hu, 2017. "Job accessibility and employment outcomes: which income groups benefit the most?," Transportation, Springer, vol. 44(6), pages 1421-1443, November.
    17. Harry J. Holzer, 1991. "The Spatial Mismatch Hypothesis: What Has the Evidence Shown?," Urban Studies, Urban Studies Journal Limited, vol. 28(1), pages 105-122, February.
    18. Vides de Andrade, Ana Regina & Lardé de Palomo, Anabella & Calderón Martínez, Lissette, 2002. "Geographical Exclusion in Rural Areas of El Salvador: Its Impact on Labor Market Outcomes," IDB Publications (Working Papers) 3275, Inter-American Development Bank.
    19. Edwin A. Sexton, 1991. "Residential Location, Workplace Location, And Black Earnings," The Review of Regional Studies, Southern Regional Science Association, vol. 21(1), pages 11-20, Spring.
    20. Michael Greene & Emily Hoffnar, 1994. "Residential location and the earnings of white and Hispanic men," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 1(8), pages 127-131.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:rre:publsh:v20:y:1990:i:1:p:10-20. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Tammy Leonard & Lei Zhang (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://www.srsa.org .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service. RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.