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Recent Changes of IMF Conditionality and Its Effects on Social Spending

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  • Gurgen OHANYAN

    () (The Bucharest University of Economic Studies, Romania)

Abstract

The IMF programs have been long criticized for having adverse effects on social spending. Yet, on the onset of the global financial crisis, it has undergone majorchanges aiming at streamlining its conditionality by introducing novel arrangements and methods to safeguard spending on health and education. Thus, the paper seeks to reveal whether the reforms have been effective and produced real change of IMF conditionality through analysing primary documents, scholarly appraisals of IMF conditionality regarding social spending. Then, by applying “before-after” approach to the most recent database of monitoring of Fund arrangements, the article concludes that the IMF after 30 years of imposing neoliberal views through conditionality has achieved notable improvement, since it streamlined conditionality in non-core areas of its mandate and introduced measures to protect social spending in low-income countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Gurgen OHANYAN, 2015. "Recent Changes of IMF Conditionality and Its Effects on Social Spending," REVISTA DE MANAGEMENT COMPARAT INTERNATIONAL/REVIEW OF INTERNATIONAL COMPARATIVE MANAGEMENT, Faculty of Management, Academy of Economic Studies, Bucharest, Romania, vol. 16(5), pages 591-602, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:rom:rmcimn:v:16:y:2015:i:5:p:591-602
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    File URL: http://rmci.ase.ro/no16vol5/04.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Axel Dreher, 2009. "IMF conditionality: theory and evidence," Public Choice, Springer, vol. 141(1), pages 233-267, October.
    2. Peter B. Clark & Jacques J. Polak, 2004. "International Liquidity and the Role of the SDR in the International Monetary System," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 51(1), pages 1-3.
    3. Rajan, Raghuram G. & Subramanian, Arvind, 2011. "Aid, Dutch disease, and manufacturing growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(1), pages 106-118, January.
    4. Benedict Clements & Sanjeev Gupta & Masahiro Nozaki, 2013. "What happens to social spending in IMF-supported programmes?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 45(28), pages 4022-4033, October.
    5. Joseph E. Stiglitz, 2004. "Capital-market Liberalization, Globalization, and the IMF," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 20(1), pages 57-71, Spring.
    6. Przeworski, Adam & Vreeland, James Raymond, 2000. "The effect of IMF programs on economic growth," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 62(2), pages 385-421, August.
    7. Kentikelenis, Alexander E. & Stubbs, Thomas H. & King, Lawrence P., 2015. "Structural adjustment and public spending on health: Evidence from IMF programs in low-income countries," Social Science & Medicine, Elsevier, vol. 126(C), pages 169-176.
    8. Graham Bird, 2001. "IMF Programmes: Is there a conditionality Laffer Curve?," World Economics, World Economics, 1 Ivory Square, Plantation Wharf, London, United Kingdom, SW11 3UE, vol. 2(2), pages 29-49, April.
    9. Mohsin S. Khan & Sunil Sharma, 2003. "IMF Conditionality and Country Ownership of Adjustment Programs," World Bank Research Observer, World Bank Group, vol. 18(2), pages 227-248.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    IMF arrangements; streamlining conditionality; social spending.;

    JEL classification:

    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • H51 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Health
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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