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Monitoring the Principal with Multiple Agents


  • Srabana Gupta
  • Richard E. Romano


Double moral hazard arises in the principal-agent model when both parties provide a nonverifiable input following contracting. Balanced-budget contracts are generally second best. If the principal's input is public to two agents, which often characterizes franchising, for example, then balanced-budget contracts exist that resolve fully double moral hazard. Agent payoffs depend on both outputs to correct principal moral hazard, rather than correlation in random effects on outputs. The equilibrium in first-best choices implemented by the contract is also unique and coalition-proof.

Suggested Citation

  • Srabana Gupta & Richard E. Romano, 1998. "Monitoring the Principal with Multiple Agents," RAND Journal of Economics, The RAND Corporation, vol. 29(2), pages 427-442, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:rje:randje:v:29:y:1998:i:summer:p:427-442

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    Cited by:

    1. Osano, Hiroshi & Kobayashi, Mami, 2005. "Double moral hazard and renegotiation," Research in Economics, Elsevier, vol. 59(4), pages 345-364, December.
    2. Jahn, Alexander, 2011. "Agency-Beziehungen in Verbundgruppen," Arbeitspapiere 105, University of Münster, Institute for Cooperatives.
    3. Zhao, Rui R., 2007. "Dynamic risk-sharing with two-sided moral hazard," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 136(1), pages 601-640, September.
    4. Ambrus, Attila, 2006. "Coalitional Rationalizability," Scholarly Articles 3200266, Harvard University Department of Economics.
    5. Dur, Robert & Non, Arjan & Roelfsema, Hein, 2010. "Reciprocity and incentive pay in the workplace," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 31(4), pages 676-686, August.
    6. Corbett, Charles J. & DeCroix, Gregory A. & Ha, Albert Y., 2005. "Optimal shared-savings contracts in supply chains: Linear contracts and double moral hazard," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 163(3), pages 653-667, June.
    7. Sverre Grepperud, 2015. "Optimal safety standards when accident prevention depends upon both firm and worker effort," European Journal of Law and Economics, Springer, vol. 39(3), pages 505-521, June.
    8. Vergara, Marcos & Bonilla, Claudio A. & Sepulveda, Jean P., 2016. "The complementarity effect: Effort and sharing in the entrepreneur and venture capital contract," European Journal of Operational Research, Elsevier, vol. 254(3), pages 1017-1025.
    9. Tsoulouhas, Theofanis, 1999. "Do tournaments solve the two-sided moral hazard problem?," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 40(3), pages 275-294, November.
    10. João Paulo Vieito & António Cerqueira & Elísio Brandão & Walayet A. Khan, 2009. "Executive Compensation: the Finance Perspective," Portuguese Journal of Management Studies, ISEG, Universidade de Lisboa, vol. 0(1), pages 3-32.

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