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Compulsory Convenience?: How Large Arterials and Land Use Affect Midblock Crossing in Fushun, China

Author

Listed:
  • Tao, Wendy

    ()

  • Mehndiratta, Shomik

    (World Bank, Beijing)

  • Deakin, Elizabeth

    (University of California, Berkeley)

Abstract

This study focuses on how street design and land uses influence pedestrian behavior in a medium-sized Chinese city, Fushun. In cities throughout China, the change from workplace-managed and assigned housing to market housing has had profound effects on pedestrians. Coupled with motorization, pedestrian trips are increasingly external, pushed out of the protected space of the gated block and onto massive arterials that now carry automobiles, trucks, and buses in growing numbers. Long blocks, unenforced zebra crossings, and inadequate green time at traffic signals do not equitably accommodate those on foot; thus, pedestrians violate the system by crossing midblock. In Fushun, the long block lengths and large arterials, lack of enforcement, and unfavorable pedestrian policies creates an environment which incentivizes midblock crossing behavior.

Suggested Citation

  • Tao, Wendy & Mehndiratta, Shomik & Deakin, Elizabeth, 2010. "Compulsory Convenience?: How Large Arterials and Land Use Affect Midblock Crossing in Fushun, China," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 3(3), pages 61-82.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:jtralu:0051
    as

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    File URL: http://www.jtlu.org/index.php/jtlu/article/view/110/144
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Xinyu Cao & Susan Handy & Patricia Mokhtarian, 2006. "The Influences of the Built Environment and Residential Self-Selection on Pedestrian Behavior: Evidence from Austin, TX," Transportation, Springer, vol. 33(1), pages 1-20, January.
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    Cited by:

    1. Zegras, P. Christopher, 2010. "Transport and Land Use in China," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 3(3), pages 1-3.
    2. Levinson, David, 2011. "Introduction," The Journal of Transport and Land Use, Center for Transportation Studies, University of Minnesota, vol. 4(1), pages 1-3.
    3. Mfinanga, David A., 2014. "Implication of pedestrians׳ stated preference of certain attributes of crosswalks," Transport Policy, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 156-164.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Transport; Land Use; China; Pedestrians;

    JEL classification:

    • R40 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - Transportation Economics - - - General

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