IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/ris/apltrx/0356.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Child benefits’ impact on poverty: Multivariate probit estimates

Author

Listed:
  • Philippova, Anna

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation)

  • Kolosnitsyna, Marina

    (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation)

Abstract

Families with children in Russia are particularly exposed to risk of poverty. In this article we analyzed child benefits’ impact poverty of households with children using pooled probit model, panel probit model with random effects and multivariate probit model. Results show that receiving of benefits is positively linked with decrease of absolute and relative poverty and increase of subjective poverty (in one of the specifications of the model).

Suggested Citation

  • Philippova, Anna & Kolosnitsyna, Marina, 2018. "Child benefits’ impact on poverty: Multivariate probit estimates," Applied Econometrics, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration (RANEPA), vol. 52, pages 62-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0356
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2018_52_062-090.pdf
    File Function: Full text
    Download Restriction: no
    ---><---

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Kolosnitsyna, Marina G. (Колосницына, Марина) & Philippova, Anna V. (Филиппова, Анна), 2017. "Child Benefits and Poverty: The Case of Russia [Детские Пособия И Бедность В России]," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 4, pages 118-153, August.
    2. Popova, Daria, 2014. "Distributional impacts of cash allowances for children: a microsimulation analysis for Russia and Europe," EUROMOD Working Papers EM2/14, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    3. Tsakloglou, Panos & O'Donoghue, Cathal & Matsaganis, Manos & Levy, Horacio & Coromaldi, Manuela & Farinha Rodrigues, Carlos & Toso, Stefano & Mercader-Prats, M., 2004. "Child poverty and family transfers in Southern Europe," EUROMOD Working Papers EM2/04, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Sutherland, Holly & Immervoll, Herwig & de Vos, Klaas, 2000. "Child poverty and child benefits in the European Union," EUROMOD Working Papers EM1/00, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    5. E. D. Slobodenyuk & V. A. Anikin., 2018. "Locating the "poverty threshold" in Russia," VOPROSY ECONOMIKI, N.P. Redaktsiya zhurnala "Voprosy Economiki", vol. 1.
    6. Shelley Phipps, 1995. "Canadian Child Benefits: Behavioural Consequences and Income Adequacy," Canadian Public Policy, University of Toronto Press, vol. 21(1), pages 20-30, March.
    7. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2003. "Multivariate probit regression using simulated maximum likelihood," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(3), pages 278-294, September.
    8. Wim Van Lancker & Natascha Van Mechelen, 2014. "Universalism under siege? Exploring the association between targeting, child benefits and child poverty across 26 countries," Working Papers 1401, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    9. Daria Popova, 2013. "Impact assessment of alternative reforms of Child Allowances using RUSMOD the static tax-benefit microsimulation model for Russia," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 1(6), pages 122-156.
    10. Markus Jäntti & Sheldon Danziger, 1994. "Child Poverty in Sweden and the United States: The Effect of Social Transfers and Parental Labor Force Participation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(1), pages 48-64, October.
    11. Eric V. Edmonds, 2005. "Targeting child benefits in a transition economy," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 13(1), pages 187-210, January.
    12. Arcanjo, M. & Bastos, A. & Nunes, F. & Passos, J., 2013. "Child poverty and the reform of family cash benefits," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 11-23.
    13. Irina Denisova & Stanislav Kolenikov & Ksenia Yudaeva, 2000. "Child Benefits and Child Poverty," Working Papers w0006, Center for Economic and Financial Research (CEFIR).
    14. Popova, Daria, 2013. "Impact assessment of alternative reforms of child allowances using RUSMOD – the static tax-benefit microsimulation model for Russia," EUROMOD Working Papers EM9/13, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    15. Bradshaw, Jonathan, 2012. "The case for family benefits," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 590-596.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Most related items

    These are the items that most often cite the same works as this one and are cited by the same works as this one.
    1. Kolosnitsyna, Marina G. (Колосницына, Марина) & Philippova, Anna V. (Филиппова, Анна), 2017. "Child Benefits and Poverty: The Case of Russia [Детские Пособия И Бедность В России]," Economic Policy, Russian Presidential Academy of National Economy and Public Administration, vol. 4, pages 118-153, August.
    2. Nicholas-James Clavet & Luca Tiberti & Marko Vladisavljevic & Jelena Zarkovic Rakic & Aleksandra Anic & Gorana Krstic & Sasa Randelovic, 2017. "Reduction of child poverty in Serbia: Improved cash-transfers or higher work incentives for parents?," Working Papers PMMA 2017-04, PEP-PMMA.
    3. Marina Kolosnitsyna & Anna Philippova, 2017. "Family Benefits and Poverty: The Case of Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 03/PSP/2017, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    4. Tess Penne & Tine Hufkens & Tim Goedeme & Berenice M L Storms, 2018. "To what extent do welfare states compensate for the cost of children? A hypothetical household approach to policy evaluations," JRC Working Papers on Taxation & Structural Reforms 2018-08, Joint Research Centre (Seville site).
    5. Maggie Ka-Wai Lau & Kee-Lee Chou, 2019. "Targeting, Universalism and Child Poverty in Hong Kong," Child Indicators Research, Springer;The International Society of Child Indicators (ISCI), vol. 12(1), pages 255-275, February.
    6. Luis F. Lopez-Calva & Nora Lustig & Mikhail Matytsin & Daria Popova, 2017. "Who Benefits from Fiscal Redistribution in the Russian Federation?," Commitment to Equity (CEQ) Working Paper Series 39, Tulane University, Department of Economics.
    7. Kazakova, Yuliya, 2019. "Childcare availability and maternal labour supply in Russia," ISER Working Paper Series 2019-11, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    8. Ivica Urban & Martina Pezer, 2020. "Compensation for Households with Children in Croatia, Slovenia and Austria," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 147(1), pages 203-235, January.
    9. Silvia Avram & Eva Militaru, 2016. "Interactions Between Policy Effects, Population Characteristics and the Tax-Benefit System: An Illustration Using Child Poverty and Child Related Policies in Romania and the Czech Republic," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 1365-1385, September.
    10. Gerlinde Verbist & Wim Van Lancker, 2016. "Horizontal and Vertical Equity Objectives of Child Benefit Systems: An Empirical Assessment for European Countries," Social Indicators Research: An International and Interdisciplinary Journal for Quality-of-Life Measurement, Springer, vol. 128(3), pages 1299-1318, September.
    11. Coral del Río & Carlos Gradín & Olga Cantó, 2006. "What helps households with children in leaving poverty? Evidence from Spain," Working Papers 24, ECINEQ, Society for the Study of Economic Inequality.
    12. Eva MILITARU & Amalia CRISTESCU, 2017. "Child policy changes and estimation of income distribution effects," Theoretical and Applied Economics, Asociatia Generala a Economistilor din Romania - AGER, vol. 0(2(611), S), pages 187-196, Summer.
    13. Marina Rybalka, 2015. "The innovative input mix. Assessing the importance of R&D and ICT investments for firm performance in manufacturing and services," Discussion Papers 801, Statistics Norway, Research Department.
    14. Fernandez-Cornejo, Jorge & Wechsler, Seth James, 2012. "Fifteen Years Later: Examining the Adoption of Bt Corn Varieties by U.S. Farmers," 2012 Annual Meeting, August 12-14, 2012, Seattle, Washington 124257, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    15. Lucía Gorjón García & Antonio Villar, 2019. "The Minimum Income Scheme as a poverty reduction mechanism:the case of the Basque Country," Studies on the Spanish Economy eee2019-10, FEDEA.
    16. Cinzia Di Novi, 2007. "An Economic Evaluation of Life-Style and Air-pollution-related Damages: Results from the BRFSS," JEPS Working Papers 07-001, JEPS.
    17. Alejandro García-Pozo & Juan Antonio Campos-Soria & J. Aníbal Núñez-Carrasco, 2021. "Technological innovation and productivity across Spanish regions," The Annals of Regional Science, Springer;Western Regional Science Association, vol. 67(1), pages 167-187, August.
    18. Luc Aroondel & Frédérique Savignac & Kévin Tracol, 2014. "Wealth and Consumption: French Households in the Crisis," International Journal of Central Banking, International Journal of Central Banking, vol. 10(3), pages 163-204, September.
    19. Simona Iammarino & Francesca Sanna-Randaccio & Maria Savona, 2007. "The perception of obstacles to innovation. Multinational and domestic firms in Italy," Working Papers of BETA 2007-12, Bureau d'Economie Théorique et Appliquée, UDS, Strasbourg.
    20. Alberto Bayo-Moriones & Jose E. Galdon-Sanchez & Maia Güell, 2010. "Is seniority-based pay used as a motivational device? Evidence from plant-level data," Research in Labor Economics, in: Solomon W. Polachek & Konstantinos Tatsiramos (ed.), Jobs, Training, and Worker Well-being, volume 30, pages 155-187, Emerald Publishing Ltd.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child benefits; absolute poverty; relative poverty; subjective poverty; multivariate probit; Russia; RLMS HSE;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0356. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: . General contact details of provider: http://appliedeconometrics.cemi.rssi.ru/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a bibliographic reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: Anatoly Peresetsky (email available below). General contact details of provider: http://appliedeconometrics.cemi.rssi.ru/ .

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.