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Child benefits’ impact on poverty: Multivariate probit estimates

Author

Listed:
  • Philippova, Anna

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation)

  • Kolosnitsyna, Marina

    () (National Research University Higher School of Economics, Moscow, Russian Federation)

Abstract

Families with children in Russia are particularly exposed to risk of poverty. In this article we analyzed child benefits’ impact poverty of households with children using pooled probit model, panel probit model with random effects and multivariate probit model. Results show that receiving of benefits is positively linked with decrease of absolute and relative poverty and increase of subjective poverty (in one of the specifications of the model).

Suggested Citation

  • Philippova, Anna & Kolosnitsyna, Marina, 2018. "Child benefits’ impact on poverty: Multivariate probit estimates," Applied Econometrics, Publishing House "SINERGIA PRESS", vol. 52, pages 62-90.
  • Handle: RePEc:ris:apltrx:0356
    as

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    File URL: http://pe.cemi.rssi.ru/pe_2018_52_062-090.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Wim Van Lancker & Natascha Van Mechelen, 2014. "Universalism under siege? Exploring the association between targeting, child benefits and child poverty across 26 countries," Working Papers 1401, Herman Deleeck Centre for Social Policy, University of Antwerp.
    2. Daria Popova, 2013. "Impact assessment of alternative reforms of Child Allowances using RUSMOD – the static tax-benefit microsimulation model for Russia," International Journal of Microsimulation, International Microsimulation Association, vol. 1(6), pages 122-156.
    3. Markus Jäntti & Sheldon Danziger, 1994. "Child Poverty in Sweden and the United States: The Effect of Social Transfers and Parental Labor Force Participation," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 48(1), pages 48-64, October.
    4. repec:rnp:ecopol:ep1745 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. Popova, Daria, 2014. "Distributional impacts of cash allowances for children: a microsimulation analysis for Russia and Europe," EUROMOD Working Papers EM2/14, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. repec:ags:stataj:116115 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Eric V. Edmonds, 2005. "Targeting child benefits in a transition economy," The Economics of Transition, The European Bank for Reconstruction and Development, vol. 13(1), pages 187-210, January.
    8. Arcanjo, M. & Bastos, A. & Nunes, F. & Passos, J., 2013. "Child poverty and the reform of family cash benefits," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 43(C), pages 11-23.
    9. Matsaganis, Manos & O'Donoghue, Cathal & Levy, Horacio & Coromaldi, Manuela & Mercader-Prats, M. & Rodrigues, Carlos Farinha & Toso, Stefano & Tsakloglou, Panos, 2004. "Child poverty and family transfers in Southern Europe," EUROMOD Working Papers EM2/04, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    10. Popova, Daria, 2013. "Impact assessment of alternative reforms of child allowances using RUSMOD - the static tax-benefit microsimulation model for Russia," EUROMOD Working Papers EM9/13, EUROMOD at the Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    11. Bradshaw, Jonathan, 2012. "The case for family benefits," Children and Youth Services Review, Elsevier, vol. 34(3), pages 590-596.
    12. repec:nos:voprec:2018-01-6 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Lorenzo Cappellari & Stephen P. Jenkins, 2003. "Multivariate probit regression using simulated maximum likelihood," Stata Journal, StataCorp LP, vol. 3(3), pages 278-294, September.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    More about this item

    Keywords

    child benefits; absolute poverty; relative poverty; subjective poverty; multivariate probit; Russia; RLMS HSE;

    JEL classification:

    • I32 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Measurement and Analysis of Poverty
    • I38 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Government Programs; Provision and Effects of Welfare Programs

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