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Business Cycle Asymmetries: International Evidence

Author

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  • W.A. Razzak

    (Reserve Bank of New Zealand)

Abstract

This paper uses the Triples test of Randles et al (1980) to detect asymmetries in US as well as international GDP fluctuations. The test does not detect any asymmetry in the distribution of the US GDP, which is consistent with previous empirical findings. However, significant asymmetries are found in international data. Detection of asymmetries is a first step towards model-selection process such that stylized facts can be replicated. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • W.A. Razzak, 2001. "Business Cycle Asymmetries: International Evidence," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 4(1), pages 230-243, January.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:v:4:y:2001:i:1:p:230-243
    DOI: 10.1006/redy.2000.0109
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Sichel, Daniel E, 1993. "Business Cycle Asymmetry: A Deeper Look," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 31(2), pages 224-236, April.
    2. Hodrick, Robert J & Prescott, Edward C, 1997. "Postwar U.S. Business Cycles: An Empirical Investigation," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 29(1), pages 1-16, February.
    3. Falk, Barry, 1986. "Further Evidence on the Asymmetric Behavior of Economic Time Series over the Business Cycle," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 94(5), pages 1096-1109, October.
    4. Kim Jeong-Ryeol & Mittnik Stefan & Rachev Svetlozar T., 1996. "Detecting Asymmetries in Observed Linear Time Series and Unobserved Disturbances," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 1(3), pages 1-15, October.
    5. W A Razzak, 1998. "Business cycle asymmetries and the nominal exchange rate regimes," Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series G98/4, Reserve Bank of New Zealand.
    6. Ramsey, James B & Rothman, Philip, 1996. "Time Irreversibility and Business Cycle Asymmetry," Journal of Money, Credit and Banking, Blackwell Publishing, vol. 28(1), pages 1-21, February.
    7. J. Bradford De Long & Lawrence H. Summers, 1984. "Are Business Cycles Symmetric?," NBER Working Papers 1444, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    8. Randal Verbrugge Randal Verbrugge, 1997. "Investigating Cyclical Asymmetries," Studies in Nonlinear Dynamics & Econometrics, De Gruyter, vol. 2(1), pages 1-10, April.
    9. Cogley, Timothy & Nason, James M., 1995. "Effects of the Hodrick-Prescott filter on trend and difference stationary time series Implications for business cycle research," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 19(1-2), pages 253-278.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    multicountry models; asymmetry; steepness; deepness;

    JEL classification:

    • E3 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • C14 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods and Methodology: General - - - Semiparametric and Nonparametric Methods: General

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