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Technology Diffusion

Author

Listed:
  • Nancy Stokey

    (University of Chicago)

Abstract

The importance of new technologies derives from the fact that they spread across many different users and uses, as well as different geographic regions. The diffusion of technological improvements, across producers within a country and across international borders, is critical for long run growth. This paper looks at some evidence on adoption patterns in the U.S. for specific innovations, reviews some evidence on the diffusion of new technologies across international boundaries, and looks at two theoretical frameworks for studying the two types of evidence. One focuses on the dynamics of adoption costs, the other on input costs. (Copyright: Elsevier)

Suggested Citation

  • Nancy Stokey, 2021. "Technology Diffusion," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 42, pages 15-36, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:issued:20-32
    DOI: 10.1016/j.red.2020.09.008
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Technology adoption; Diffusion; Innovation; Technical change;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • O33 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Technological Change: Choices and Consequences; Diffusion Processes
    • O14 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Industrialization; Manufacturing and Service Industries; Choice of Technology

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