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Cross-border Capital Flows since the Global Financial Crisis


  • Ewan Rankin

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Elliot James

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)

  • Kate McLoughlin

    (Reserve Bank of Australia)


Global gross capital flows remain well below their peak before the global financial crisis, which was reached after a period of unusual expansion. Much of the decline can be attributed to a reduced flow of lending by banks – particularly to, from and within the euro area – as banks have unwound many of the cross-border positions they built up before the crisis. Capital inflows to some economies, however, are now larger than they were before the crisis. The international regulatory response to the crisis aims to address some of the risks associated with increased capital flows, while maintaining the benefits of an integrated financial system.

Suggested Citation

  • Ewan Rankin & Elliot James & Kate McLoughlin, 2014. "Cross-border Capital Flows since the Global Financial Crisis," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 65-72, June.
  • Handle: RePEc:rba:rbabul:jun2014-08

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Kose, M. Ayhan & Prasad, Eswar & Terrones, Marco E., 2007. "How Does Financial Globalization Affect Risk Sharing? Patterns and Channels," IZA Discussion Papers 2903, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    2. M Ayhan Kose & Eswar Prasad & Kenneth Rogoff & Shang-Jin Wei, 2009. "Financial Globalization: A Reappraisal," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(1), pages 8-62, April.
    3. Carl Schwartz, 2013. "G20 Financial Regulatory Reforms and Australia," RBA Bulletin, Reserve Bank of Australia, pages 77-86, September.
    4. Obstfeld, Maurice, 2012. "Financial flows, financial crises, and global imbalances," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 31(3), pages 469-480.
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    Cited by:

    1. LUCHIAN, Ivan & FILIP, Angela, 2015. "Globalization As Financial Crises Premise," Journal of Financial and Monetary Economics, Centre of Financial and Monetary Research "Victor Slavescu", vol. 2(1), pages 127-134.
    2. Dong Chen & Yanmin Gao & Mayank Kaul & Charles Ka Yui Leung & Desmond Tsang, 2016. "The Role of Sponsors and External Management on the Capital Structure of Asian-Pacific REITs: The Case of Australia, Japan, and Singapore," International Real Estate Review, Asian Real Estate Society, vol. 19(2), pages 197-221.


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