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Government Investment and Economic Growth in the Developing World

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  • Mohsin S. Khan

    (Research Department, International Monetary Fund, Washington, D. C.)

Abstract

There has been a sea change in the views of the economics profession as well as economic policy-makers over the past decade or so regarding the role of the government in the development process. Indeed, it is now becoming conventional wisdom that government can no longer be a dominant player in economic activities, but rather should restrict itself to providing an “enabling” environment within which the private sector can take the lead and flourish. More specifically, government intervention in the economy has to be designed carefully so as to support the private sector and not inhibit its development. The general acceptance of this paradigm is evident in the steadily declining importance of government activities in the economies of most of the developing world. But does this new paradigm mean that government investment has no role whatsoever in affecting growth in developing countries? Reality is that public investment still represents a large share of total investment in the majority of developing countries, and the question is what role it plays in relation to private investment in stimulating economic growth. The objective of this paper is to ascertain empirically for a large group of developing countries the relative importance of public and private investment in promoting and sustaining growth.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohsin S. Khan, 1996. "Government Investment and Economic Growth in the Developing World," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 35(4), pages 419-439.
  • Handle: RePEc:pid:journl:v:35:y:1996:i:4:p:419-439
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    File URL: http://www.pide.org.pk/pdf/PDR/1996/Volume4/419-439.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

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    2. Bakari, Sayef, 2018. "The Impact of Domestic Investment on Economic Growth New Policy Analysis from Algeria," Bulletin of Economic Theory and Analysis, BETA Journals, vol. 3(1), pages 35-51, March.
    3. Sayef Bakari & Sofien Tiba & Nissar Fakraoui, 2019. "Does Domestic Investment Contribute To Economic Growth In Uruguay? What Did The Empirical Facts Say?," Journal of Smart Economic Growth, , vol. 4(2), pages 53-69, September.
    4. Ahmed Badawi, 2003. "Private capital formation and public investment in Sudan: testing the substitutability and complementarity hypotheses in a growth framework," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 15(6), pages 783-799.
    5. Sayef Bakari & Mohamed Mabrouki & Abdelhafidh Othmani, 2018. "The Six Linkages Between Foreign Direct Investment, Domestic Investment, Exports, Imports, Labor Force And Economic Growth: New Empirical And Policy Analysis From Nigeria," Journal of Smart Economic Growth, , vol. 3(1), pages 25-43, Juin.
    6. Ndikumana, Leonce, 2000. "Financial Determinants of Domestic Investment in Sub-Saharan Africa: Evidence from Panel Data," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 28(2), pages 381-400, February.
    7. Mahmoud Khalid Almsafir & Zurina Mohammad Morzuki, 2015. "The Relationship between Investment and Economic Growth in Malaysia," Journal of Empirical Economics, Research Academy of Social Sciences, vol. 4(2), pages 116-126.
    8. Leonce Ndikumana, 2008. "Can macroeconomic policy stimulate private investment in South Africa? New insights from aggregate and manufacturing sector-level evidence," Journal of International Development, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 20(7), pages 869-887.
    9. Monica Raileanu Szeles & Rodrigo Mendieta Muñoz, 2016. "Analyzing the Regional Economic Convergence in Ecuador. Insights from Parametric and Nonparametric Models," Journal for Economic Forecasting, Institute for Economic Forecasting, vol. 0(2), pages 43-65, June.
    10. Ali Alichi & Rabah Arezki, 2012. "An alternative explanation for the resource curse: the income effect channel," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 44(22), pages 2881-2894, August.
    11. Muhammad Farooq Arby & Irem Batool, 2007. "Estimating Quarterly Gross Fixed Capital Formation," SBP Working Paper Series 17, State Bank of Pakistan, Research Department.
    12. Sayef Bakari & Mohamed Mabrouki & Asma Elmakki, 2018. "The Impact of Domestic Investment in the Industrial Sector on Economic Growth with Partial Openness: Evidence from Tunisia," Economics Bulletin, AccessEcon, vol. 38(1), pages 111-128.
    13. Ejaz Ghani & Musleh-Ud Din, 2006. "The Impact of Public Investment on Economic Growth in Pakistan," The Pakistan Development Review, Pakistan Institute of Development Economics, vol. 45(1), pages 87-98.

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