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Are the Gaps Closing? - Regional Trends and Forecasts of Indigenous Employment

Author

Listed:
  • Nicholas Biddle

    () (The Australian National University)

  • John Taylor

    (The Australian National University)

Abstract

This paper examines the extent to which Indigenous Australians have shared in the large expansion of the Australian workforce as revealed by a comparison of 2001 and 2006 census results and whether there have been any associated general patterns. As such, it provides the first comprehensive assessment of possible impacts of federal Indigenous employment policies introduced just prior to the 2001 Census and it contributes to the policy discourse on ‘closing the gap’ between Indigenous and other Australians. Conventional census measures of labour force status are established for each of 37 Indigenous Regions with a particular focus on changes in full-time private sector employment. In line with the policy focus on gap analysis an attempt is made to estimate future job requirements using a projection of the Indigenous working-age population to 2016. This reveals a need for more than 117,000 additional jobs to meet current government targets.

Suggested Citation

  • Nicholas Biddle & John Taylor, 2009. "Are the Gaps Closing? - Regional Trends and Forecasts of Indigenous Employment," Australian Journal of Labour Economics (AJLE), Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School, vol. 12(3), pages 263-280.
  • Handle: RePEc:ozl:journl:v:12:y:2009:i:3:p:263-280
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Itismita Mohanty & Robert Tanton, 2012. "A wellbeing framework with adaptive capacity," NATSEM Working Paper Series 12/17, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
    2. Laurie Brown & Binod Nepal, 2011. "Modelling Potential Impact of Improved Survival of Indigenous Australians on Work-Life Labour Income Gap Between Indigenous and Average Australians," NATSEM Working Paper Series 11/15, University of Canberra, National Centre for Social and Economic Modelling.
    3. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Taverdi, 2016. "Self-assessed versus statistical evidence of labour market discrimination," Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre Working Paper series WP1602, Bankwest Curtin Economics Centre (BCEC), Curtin Business School.
    4. Catherine Ris, 2013. "Les inégalités ethniques dans l'accès à l'emploi en Nouvelle-Calédonie," Économie et Statistique, Programme National Persée, vol. 464(1), pages 59-72.
    5. Alan Duncan & Astghik Mavisakalyan & Yashar Tarverdi, 2016. "Self-assessed versus statistical evidence of labour market discrimination The case of indigenous Australians," WIDER Working Paper Series 070, World Institute for Development Economic Research (UNU-WIDER).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Labour Economics: General Regional Economic Activity: Growth; Development and Changes Economics of Minorities and Races; Non-Labour Discrimination;

    JEL classification:

    • J01 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics: General
    • R11 - Urban, Rural, Regional, Real Estate, and Transportation Economics - - General Regional Economics - - - Regional Economic Activity: Growth, Development, Environmental Issues, and Changes
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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