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Monetary valuation of cardiovascular disease in Canada

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  • Ehsan Latif

Abstract

The study estimated a well-being function to determine how much monetary value individuals assign for cardiovascular disease in Canada. The study found that the calculated compensating income variation is $33,701, suggesting that an individual is required to be paid this amount to compensate for the loss in well-being due to cardiovascular disease. The study further shows that the compensating income variation is higher for women than for men. The study also finds that compensating income variation decreases with age. Â

Suggested Citation

  • Ehsan Latif, 2012. "Monetary valuation of cardiovascular disease in Canada," Economics and Business Letters, Oviedo University Press, vol. 1(1), pages 46-52.
  • Handle: RePEc:ove:journl:aid:9224
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    File URL: http://www.unioviedo.es/reunido/index.php/EBL/article/view/9224
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    6. Bernard van den Berg & Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell, 2007. "Monetary valuation of informal care: the well-being valuation method," Health Economics, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 16(11), pages 1227-1244.
    7. Powdthavee, Nattavudh & van den Berg, Bernard, 2011. "Putting different price tags on the same health condition: Re-evaluating the well-being valuation approach," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(5), pages 1032-1043.
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    Cited by:

    1. Howley, Peter, 2017. "Less money or better health? Evaluating individual’s willingness to make trade-offs using life satisfaction data," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 135(C), pages 53-65.

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