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Why Do (Some) Households Trade So Much?

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  • Juhani T. Linnainmaa

Abstract

When agents can learn about their abilities as active investors, they rationally "trade to learn" even if they expect to lose from active investing. The model used to develop this insight draws conclusions that are consistent with empirical study of household trading behavior: Households' portfolios underperform passive investments; their trading intensity depends on past performance; and they begin by trading small sums of money. Using household data from Finland, the article estimates a structural model of learning and trading. The estimated model shows that investors trade to learn even if they are pessimistic about their abilities as traders. It also demonstrates that realized returns are significantly downward-biased measures of investors' true abilities. The Author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Society for Financial Studies. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Juhani T. Linnainmaa, 2011. "Why Do (Some) Households Trade So Much?," Review of Financial Studies, Society for Financial Studies, vol. 24(5), pages 1630-1666.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:rfinst:v:24:y:2011:i:5:p:1630-1666
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/rfs/hhr009
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Cici, Gjergji & Gehde-Trapp, Monika & Göricke, Marc-André & Kempf, Alexander, 2014. "What they did in their previous life: The investment value of mutual fund managers' experience outside the financial sector," CFR Working Papers 14-11, University of Cologne, Centre for Financial Research (CFR).
    2. Barrot, Jean-Noel & Kaniel, Ron & Sraer, David, 2016. "Are retail traders compensated for providing liquidity?," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 120(1), pages 146-168.
    3. Ben-David, Itzhak & Birru, Justin & Prokopenya, Viktor, 2015. "Uninformative Feedback and Risk Taking: Evidence from Retail Forex Trading," Working Paper Series 2014-17, Ohio State University, Charles A. Dice Center for Research in Financial Economics.
    4. Rawley Z. Heimer & Alp Simsek, 2017. "Should Retail Investors' Leverage Be Limited?," NBER Working Papers 24176, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    5. Heimer, Rawley, 2014. "Can Leverage Constraints Help Investors?," Working Papers (Old Series) 1433, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    6. repec:eee:jfinec:v:132:y:2019:i:3:p:1-21 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Barber, Brad M. & Lee, Yi-Tsung & Liu, Yu-Jane & Odean, Terrance, 2014. "The cross-section of speculator skill: Evidence from day trading," Journal of Financial Markets, Elsevier, vol. 18(C), pages 1-24.
    8. Grinblatt, Mark & Keloharju, Matti & Linnainmaa, Juhani T., 2012. "IQ, trading behavior, and performance," Journal of Financial Economics, Elsevier, vol. 104(2), pages 339-362.
    9. Barth, Daniel, 2014. "The costs and beliefs impliedby direct stock ownership," Working Paper Series 1657, European Central Bank.
    10. John Y. Campbell & Tarun Ramadorai & Benjamin Ranish, 2014. "Getting Better or Feeling Better? How Equity Investors Respond to Investment Experience," NBER Working Papers 20000, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    11. Hayley, Simon & Marsh, Ian W., 2016. "What do retail FX traders learn?," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 16-38.
    12. Heimer, Rawley & Simon, David, 2015. "Facebook Finance: How Social Interaction Propagates Active Investing," Working Papers (Old Series) 1522, Federal Reserve Bank of Cleveland.
    13. Kuo, Wei-Yu & Lin, Tse-Chun, 2013. "Overconfident individual day traders: Evidence from the Taiwan futures market," Journal of Banking & Finance, Elsevier, vol. 37(9), pages 3548-3561.
    14. Anagol, Santosh & Balasubramaniam, Vimal & Ramadorai, Tarun, 2018. "Learning from Noise: Evidence from India's IPO Lotteries," CEPR Discussion Papers 13314, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    15. Heimer, Rawley Z., 2014. "Friends do let friends buy stocks actively," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PB), pages 527-540.

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