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Reflections on the Literature


  • V. Kerry Smith


This paper considers two areas of current research related to environmental economics: 1. the use of quasi-experimental or "experimentalist" methods to evaluate the effects of environmental policies; and 2. the implications of the Stern Report on the economic consequences of global climate change. The objective of the paper is to stimulate the discussion and exchange of ideas. The paper examines applications of the experimentalist approach to hedonic property models associated with the regulation of air pollution and the cleanup of hazardous waste at Superfund sites. The discussion of the Stern Report considers whether we should evaluate the merits of reducing the stringency of current environmental policies in order to increase the efforts devoted to controlling pollutants that contribute to long term climate risks. Copyright 2007, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • V. Kerry Smith, 2007. "Reflections on the Literature," Review of Environmental Economics and Policy, Association of Environmental and Resource Economists, vol. 1(2), pages 300-318, Summer.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:renvpo:v:1:y:2007:i:2:p:300-318

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    References listed on IDEAS

    1. Dominika Kalinowska & Kerim Keser & Uwe Kunert, 2009. "CO2 Based Taxation on Cars Is Rising in Europe," Weekly Report, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research, vol. 5(23), pages 159-170.
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    5. Antonio M. Bento & Lawrence H. Goulder & Mark R. Jacobsen & Roger H. von Haefen, 2009. "Distributional and Efficiency Impacts of Increased US Gasoline Taxes," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 99(3), pages 667-699, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Levinson, Arik, 2012. "Valuing public goods using happiness data: The case of air quality," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 96(9-10), pages 869-880.
    2. Schubert, Christian, 2017. "Green nudges: Do they work? Are they ethical?," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 132(C), pages 329-342.
    3. Lisa A. Robinson & James K. Hammitt, 2013. "Behavioral economics and the conduct of benefit–cost analysis: towards principles and standards," Chapters,in: Principles and Standards for Benefit–Cost Analysis, chapter 10, pages 317-363 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    4. Kip Viscusi, W. & Gayer, Ted, 2016. "Rational Benefit Assessment for an Irrational World: Toward a Behavioral Transfer Test," Journal of Benefit-Cost Analysis, Cambridge University Press, vol. 7(01), pages 69-91, March.
    5. Ambrey, Christopher L. & Fleming, Christopher M., 2011. "Valuing scenic amenity using life satisfaction data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 106-115.
    6. Pemberton, Carlisle A. & Harris-Charles, Emaline & Patterson-Andrews, Hazel, 2010. "Cultural bias in contingent valuation of copper mining in the Commonwealth of Dominica," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(1), pages 19-23, November.
    7. Tobias Menz & Heinz Welsch, 2012. "Life-Cycle and Cohort Effects in the Valuation of Air Quality: Evidence from Subjective Well-being Data," Land Economics, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 88(2), pages 300-325.
    8. Ambrey, Christopher L. & Fleming, Christopher M., 2011. "Valuing Ecosystem Diversity in South East Queensland: A Life Satisfaction Approach," 2011 Conference, August 25-26, 2011, Nelson, New Zealand 115347, New Zealand Agricultural and Resource Economics Society.
    9. Aalbers, Rob & Shestalova, Victoria & Kocsis, Viktória, 2013. "Innovation policy for directing technical change in the power sector," Energy Policy, Elsevier, vol. 63(C), pages 1240-1250.
    10. Menz, Tobias, 2011. "Do people habituate to air pollution? Evidence from international life satisfaction data," Ecological Economics, Elsevier, vol. 71(C), pages 211-219.
    11. Arik Levinson, 2013. "Happiness as a Public Policy Tool," Working Papers gueconwpa~13-13-04, Georgetown University, Department of Economics.
    12. Arik Levinson, 2013. "Happiness, Behavioral Economics, and Public Policy," NBER Working Papers 19329, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    13. Welsch, Heinz & Ferreira, Susana, 2014. "Environment, Well-Being, and Experienced Preference," International Review of Environmental and Resource Economics, now publishers, vol. 7(3-4), pages 205-239, December.
    14. Ranjan Ram, 2011. "Self Insurance and Insurance Demand under Self-Deception," Asia-Pacific Journal of Risk and Insurance, De Gruyter, vol. 5(2), pages 1-27, July.
    15. Susanne Menzel & Tom L. Green, 2013. "Sovereign Citizens and Constrained Consumers: Why Sustainability Requires Limits on Choice," Environmental Values, White Horse Press, vol. 22(1), pages 59-79, February.

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