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The Design and Effects of Monetary Policy in Sub-Saharan African Countries-super- †


  • Mohsin S. Khan


Since the 1990s there have been a number of major changes in the design and conduct of monetary policy. In a globalised environment, there is greater need to achieve closer convergence of economic performance among trading partners. As a result, a number of developing countries have adopted exchange rate regimes with more flexibility, and thereby greater scope for monetary policy. Notable examples include a number of Sub-Saharan African countries moving from fixed exchange-rate regimes to more flexible regimes and the adoption of formal or informal inflation targeting regimes by some of these countries. These changes have triggered considerable debate on how monetary policy should be conducted and the effects it has on the real economy. Copyright 2011 The author 2011. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email:, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Mohsin S. Khan, 2011. "The Design and Effects of Monetary Policy in Sub-Saharan African Countries-super- †," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 20(suppl_2), pages -35, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:20:y:2011:i:suppl_2:p:-ii35

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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Charles Abuka & Ronnie K Alinda & Camelia Minoiu & José-Luis Peydró & Andrea Presbitero, 2015. "Monetary Policy in a Developing Country; Loan Applications and Real Effects," IMF Working Papers 15/270, International Monetary Fund.
    2. Effiong, Ekpeno & Esu, Godwin & Chuku, Chuku, 2017. "Financial Development and Monetary Policy Effectiveness in Africa," MPRA Paper 79732, University Library of Munich, Germany.

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