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The Value of a Nutritionally Enhanced Staple Crop: Results from a Choice Experiment Conducted with Orange-fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Mozambique


  • Abdul T. A. Naico
  • Jayson L. Lusk


A number of strategies have been proposed to reduce nutritional deficiencies in developing countries. In this paper, we investigated the extent to which consumers in Mozambique would be willing to consume new varieties of orange-fleshed sweet potatoes (OFSPs), which are rich in vitamin A, relative to the traditionally consumed white sweet potato varieties. Using data from a choice experiment administered in person with sweet potato shoppers, we find consumers are willing to pay premiums for OFSPs if they can be produced to possess eating quality similar to traditional varieties. Although consumers prefer orange flesh to the white, dry matter content was the most important quality attribute. Thus, for the nutritional benefits of the new varieties to be realised, plant-breeding programmes should focus on improving the dry matter content of the new orange flesh varieties. Finally, our results indicate that preferences for OFSPs are influenced by information about nutritional benefits, whether the questioning format provided incentives for people to think carefully about their responses, and whether people resided in urban or rural locations. Copyright 2010 The author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Centre for the Study of African Economies. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email:, Oxford University Press.

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  • Abdul T. A. Naico & Jayson L. Lusk, 2010. "The Value of a Nutritionally Enhanced Staple Crop: Results from a Choice Experiment Conducted with Orange-fleshed Sweet Potatoes in Mozambique," Journal of African Economies, Centre for the Study of African Economies (CSAE), vol. 19(4), pages 536-558, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:jafrec:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:536-558

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    Cited by:

    1. Murekezi, Abdoul & Oparinde, Adewale & Birol, Ekin, 2017. "Consumer market segments for biofortified iron beans in Rwanda: Evidence from a hedonic testing study," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 35-49.
    2. Dolgopolova, Irina & Teuber, Ramona, 2016. "Consumers’ Willingness-to-pay for Health-enhancing Attributes in Food Products: A Meta-analysis," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235390, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    3. Etumnu, Chinonso, 2016. "Behavioral Determinants of Biofortified Food Acceptance: The Case of Orange-fleshed Sweet Potato in Ghana," 2016 Annual Meeting, July 31-August 2, 2016, Boston, Massachusetts 235249, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    4. Okello, Julius J. & Shikuku, Kelvin M. & Sindi, Kirimi & Low, Jan, 2014. "Farmer perception and attitude towards orange flesh sweetpotato attributes: an analysis of common beliefs about sweetpotato production and consumption," 2014 International Congress, August 26-29, 2014, Ljubljana, Slovenia 182984, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    5. Mwiti, Florine & Okello, Julius J. & Munei, Kimpei, 2015. "Are Farmers Willing to Pay for Quality Planting Materials of Clonally Propagated Biofortified Crops? The Case of Orange-Fleshed Sweetpotatoe in Tanzania," 2015 Conference, August 9-14, 2015, Milan, Italy 212519, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    6. Brauw, Alan de & Eozenou, Patrick & Gilligan, Daniel O. & Hotz, Christine & Kumar, Neha & Meenakshi, J.V., 2013. "Biofortification, crop adoption and health information: Impact pathways in Mozambique and Uganda," 2013 Annual Meeting, August 4-6, 2013, Washington, D.C. 150514, Agricultural and Applied Economics Association.
    7. Banerji, Abhijit & Birol, Ekin & Karandikar, Bhushana & Rampal, Jeevant, 2016. "Information, branding, certification, and consumer willingness to pay for high-iron pearl millet: Evidence from experimental auctions in Maharashtra, India," Food Policy, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 133-141.

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