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Organizational learning and systems of labor market regulation in Europe

Author

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  • Jacob R. Holm
  • Edward Lorenz
  • Bengt-Åke Lundvall
  • Antoine Valeyre

Abstract

This article establishes a link between international differences in the organization of work and modes of regulation of labor markets within Europe. The article operates with four forms of work organization (discretionary learning, lean production, Taylorism, and simple or traditional). Through a factor analysis three dimensions of national labor market systems (flexible security, passive security, and job support) are defined. Using a multi-level logistic regression model that takes into account both characteristics of individuals and of national labor market systems it is shown that there is a significant positive correlation between flexible security and the prevalence of discretionary learning. On this basis we point to an extension of flexible security in Europe's labor markets as an adequate response to the current crisis. Copyright 2010 The Author 2010. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Associazione ICC. All rights reserved., Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Jacob R. Holm & Edward Lorenz & Bengt-Åke Lundvall & Antoine Valeyre, 2010. "Organizational learning and systems of labor market regulation in Europe," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 19(4), pages 1141-1173, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:19:y:2010:i:4:p:1141-1173
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/icc/dtq004
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    Cited by:

    1. Andrea Filippetti & Frederick Guy, 2016. "Risk-taking, skill diversity, and the quality of human capital: how insurance affects innovation," Papers in Evolutionary Economic Geography (PEEG) 1625, Utrecht University, Department of Human Geography and Spatial Planning, Group Economic Geography, revised Aug 2016.
    2. Marsden, David, 2015. "The future of the German industrial relations model," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 62932, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    3. Edward Lorenz, 2011. "Do labour markets and educational and training systems matter for innovation outcomes? A multi-level analysis for the EU-27," Science and Public Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 38(9), pages 691-702, November.
    4. David Marsden, 2015. "The Future of the German Industrial Relations Model," CEP Discussion Papers dp1344, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    5. David Marsden, 2010. "The End of National Models in Employment Relations?," CEP Discussion Papers dp0998, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    6. Christine Erhel & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière & Janine Leschke & Andrew Watt, 2014. "Tendances de la qualité de l'emploi pendant la crise : une approche européenne comparative / Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach for the EU," Working Papers halshs-00966885, HAL.
    7. Christine Erhel & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière & Janine Leschke & Andrew Watt, 2014. "Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach for the EU / Tendances de la qualité de l'emploi pendant la crise : une approche européenne comparative," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00966898, HAL.
    8. Christine Erhel & Mathilde Guergoat-Larivière & Janine Leschke & Andrew Watt, 2014. "Tendances de la qualité de l'emploi pendant la crise : une approche européenne comparative / Trends in Job Quality during the Great Recession: a Comparative Approach for the EU," Université Paris1 Panthéon-Sorbonne (Post-Print and Working Papers) halshs-00966885, HAL.

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