IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/indcch/v17y2008i1p1-27.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Understanding an emergent diversity of corporate governance and organizational architecture: an essentiality-based analysis -super-1

Author

Listed:
  • Masahiko Aoki
  • Gregory Jackson

Abstract

This article proposes a simple framework for understanding an emergent diversity of linkages between corporate governance (CG) and organizational architecture (OA). It distinguishes discreet modes of their linkage by different combinatorial patterns between three basic assets: managers' human assets (MHA), workers' human assets (WHA), and non-human assets (NHA). Using the concept of essentiality of human assets proposed by Hart ( 1995 ) and distinguished from that of complementarities, we first propose a new characterization of four known modes of CG-OA linkage: three traditional (Anglo-American, German, and Japanese) and one relatively new (Silicon Valley) models. Then we present empirical evidences of emergent diversity of CG-OA linkages in Japan, which is somewhat at odds with the old Japanese model. We interpret its emergent dominant mode as the path-dependent evolution of a new pattern of essentiality between human assets, made viable by lessening of institutional-complementarity-constraints, which surrounded the traditional Japanese model. We argue that this new mode interpreted in terms of essentiality may have broader applicability beyond Japanese context. Copyright 2008 , Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Masahiko Aoki & Gregory Jackson, 2008. "Understanding an emergent diversity of corporate governance and organizational architecture: an essentiality-based analysis -super-1," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 17(1), pages 1-27, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:17:y:2008:i:1:p:1-27
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/icc/dtm037
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Gerhard Schnyder, 2012. "Measuring Corporate Governance: Lessons from the 'Bundles Approach'," Working Papers wp438, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    2. MIYAJIMA Hideaki, 2009. "Pluralistic Evolution of the Japanese-Style Enterprise System: Toward the Hybrid Model (Japanese)," Discussion Papers (Japanese) 09017, Research Institute of Economy, Trade and Industry (RIETI).
    3. Simon Deakin & Jonas Malmberg & Prabirjit Sarkar, 2013. "Do Labour Laws Increase Equality at the Expense of Higher Unemployment? The Experience of Six OECD Countries, 1970-2010," Working Papers wp442, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    4. Michael A. Witt & Gregory Jackson, 2016. "Varieties of Capitalism and institutional comparative advantage: A test and reinterpretation," Journal of International Business Studies, Palgrave Macmillan;Academy of International Business, vol. 47(7), pages 778-806, September.
    5. Lechevalier, Sébastien & Nishimura, Junichi & Storz, Cornelia, 2014. "Diversity in patterns of industry evolution: How an intrapreneurial regime contributed to the emergence of the service robot industry," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 43(10), pages 1716-1729.
    6. Simon Deakin, 2013. "The Legal Framework Governing Business Firms & its Implications for Manufacturing Scale & Performance: The UK Experience in International Perspective," Working Papers wp449, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    7. Marie CORIS (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113) & Vincent FRIGANT (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113) & Yannick LUNG (GREThA UMR CNRS 5113), 2009. "Organizational change and institutional diversity (In French)," Cahiers du GREThA 2009-23, Groupe de Recherche en Economie Théorique et Appliquée.
    8. Honoré, Florence & Munari, Federico & van Pottelsberghe de La Potterie, Bruno, 2015. "Corporate governance practices and companies’ R&D intensity: Evidence from European countries," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 44(2), pages 533-543.
    9. John Buchanan & Dominic Heesang Chai & Simon Deakin, 2013. "Agency Theory in Practice: A Qualitative Study of Hedge Fund Activism in Japan," Working Papers wp448, Centre for Business Research, University of Cambridge.
    10. Giuri, Paola & Rullani, Francesco & Torrisi, Salvatore, 2008. "Explaining leadership in virtual teams: The case of open source software," Information Economics and Policy, Elsevier, vol. 20(4), pages 305-315, December.
    11. Min, Byung-Seong, 2013. "Evaluation of board reforms: An examination of the appointment of outside directors," Journal of the Japanese and International Economies, Elsevier, vol. 29(C), pages 21-43.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:17:y:2008:i:1:p:1-27. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press) or (Christopher F. Baum). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/icc .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    We have no references for this item. You can help adding them by using this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.