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The evolution of inertia


  • Michael T. Hannan
  • L·szlÛ PÛlos
  • Glenn R. Carroll


This article examines some evolutionary consequences of architectural inertia in organizations. The main theorem holds that selection favors architectural inertia in the sense that the median level of inertia in a closed population of organizations increases over time. The other key theorems hold that the selection intensity favoring architectural inertia increases with the levels of intricacy and structural opacity and decreases with cultural asperity. Copyright 2004, Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • Michael T. Hannan & L·szlÛ PÛlos & Glenn R. Carroll, 2004. "The evolution of inertia," Industrial and Corporate Change, Oxford University Press, vol. 13(1), pages 213-242, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:indcch:v:13:y:2004:i:1:p:213-242

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    Cited by:

    1. Bryson, Alex & Gomez, Rafael & Kretschmer, Tobias, 2005. "Catching a wave: the adoption of voice and high commitment workplace practices in Britain: 1984-1998," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 19909, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    2. Burgelman, Robert A. & Grove, Andrew S., 2007. "Let Chaos Reign, Then Rein In Chaos--Repeatedly: Managing Strategic Dynamics For Corporate Longevity," Research Papers 1954, Stanford University, Graduate School of Business.
    3. Baliga, B.R. & Santalainen, Timo J., 2006. "Transformation of state-owned enterprises in Estonia and India: An examination of the relative influences of cultural variations," Journal of International Management, Elsevier, vol. 12(2), pages 140-157, June.
    4. Jason Collins & Boris Baer & Ernst Weber, 2015. "Sexual selection, conspicuous consumption and economic growth," Journal of Bioeconomics, Springer, vol. 17(2), pages 189-206, July.
    5. Sandhya Garg, 2015. "Spatial convergence in public expenditure across Indian states: Implication of federal transfers," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2015-028, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    6. Ioannis Ioannou & George Serafeim, 2015. "The impact of corporate social responsibility on investment recommendations: Analysts' perceptions and shifting institutional logics," Strategic Management Journal, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 36(7), pages 1053-1081, July.

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