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Structural Adjustment and the Peasantry in Morocco: A Computable Household Model

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  • de Janvry, A, et al

Abstract

A computable nonseparable household (CNH) model approach is used as a tool to analyze, at the microlevel, the impacts of changes in macro and sectoral policies. Nonseparability originates in market failures for some products and factors and in a binding credit constraint. While the results are only suggestive until this type of model is consistently estimated, they indicate the tremendous heterogeneity of impacts across household types. For Morocco, they show that, while higher cereals prices displace resources from livestock to grains, rising prices of animal feeds induce a shift in how livestock is produced toward the use of factors with market failures, in this case child labor for herding and grazing in the commons. Copyright 1992 by Oxford University Press.

Suggested Citation

  • de Janvry, A, et al, 1992. "Structural Adjustment and the Peasantry in Morocco: A Computable Household Model," European Review of Agricultural Economics, Foundation for the European Review of Agricultural Economics, vol. 19(4), pages 427-453.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:erevae:v:19:y:1992:i:4:p:427-53
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    Cited by:

    1. De Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth & Murgai, Rinku, 2002. "Rural development and rural policy," Handbook of Agricultural Economics,in: B. L. Gardner & G. C. Rausser (ed.), Handbook of Agricultural Economics, edition 1, volume 2, chapter 31, pages 1593-1658 Elsevier.
    2. Fafchamps, Marcel & De Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1995. "Transaction Costs, Market Failures, Competitiveness and the State," 1994 Conference, August 22-29, 1994, Harare, Zimbabwe 183396, International Association of Agricultural Economists.
    3. repec:bla:agecon:v:25:y:2000:i:1:p:103-118 is not listed on IDEAS
    4. Ahmed, Mohamed M. & Preckel, Paul V. & Baker, Timothy G. & Lopez-Pereira, Miguel, 2001. "Modeling the impact of technological change on nutrition and marketed surplus," Agricultural Economics, Blackwell, vol. 25(1), pages 103-118, June.
    5. Muriithi, Beatrice W. & Matz, Julia Anna, 2014. "Smallholder Participation in the Commercialisation of Vegetables: Evidence from Kenyan Panel Data," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universitaat zu Berlin, vol. 53(2), pages 1-28, May.
    6. Narayanan, Sudha & Gulati, Ashok, 2002. "Globalization and the smallholders," MTID discussion papers 50, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    7. de Janvry, Alain & Sadoulet, Elisabeth, 1996. "Household Modeling For The Design Of Poverty Alleviation Strategies," CUDARE Working Papers 25121, University of California, Berkeley, Department of Agricultural and Resource Economics.
    8. Henning, Christian H.C.A. & Henningsen, Arne, 2005. "Modeling Price Response of Farm Households Under Imperfect Labor Markets: A Farm Household Approach to Family Farms in Poland," 94th Seminar, April 9-10, 2005, Ashford, UK 24431, European Association of Agricultural Economists.
    9. Lofgren, Hans & Doukkali, Rachid & Serghini, Hassan & Robinson, Sherman, 1997. "Rural development in Morocco: alternative scenarios to the year 2000," TMD discussion papers 17, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).
    10. Mohapatra, Sandeep & Barrett, Christopher B. & Snyder, Donald L. & Biswas, Basudeb, 1998. "Does Food Aid Really Discourage Food Production?," Economics Research Institute, ERI Study Papers 28369, Utah State University, Economics Department.
    11. Dorward, Andrew, 2012. "Conceptualising the Effects of Seasonal Financial Market Failures and Credit Rationing in Applied Rural Household Models," Quarterly Journal of International Agriculture, Humboldt-Universitaat zu Berlin, vol. 51(2), pages 1-21, May.
    12. Lofgren, Hans & El-Said, Moataz & Robinson, Sherman, 1999. "Trade liberalization and complementary domestic policies: a rural-urban general equilibrium analysis of Morocco," TMD discussion papers 41, International Food Policy Research Institute (IFPRI).

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