IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/oup/cjrecs/v9y2016i1p153-178..html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Unbalanced regional resilience to the economic crisis in Spain: a tale of specialisation and productivity

Author

Listed:
  • Juan R. Cuadrado-Roura
  • Andrés Maroto

Abstract

The recent economic and financial crisis has generated significant and particularly adverse effects in Spain. All the regions were strongly affected, albeit with notable differences. The aim of this article is not to analyse the impact of the economic and financial crisis on the Spanish regions, but to contribute to an understanding of the resilient behaviour displayed by some regions by examining productive specialisation and its effects on regional productivity as explaining factors. The main conclusion is that the most resilient regions are those that had previously specialised in dynamic and productive industries, such as energy, some manufacturing and some advanced market services.

Suggested Citation

  • Juan R. Cuadrado-Roura & Andrés Maroto, 2016. "Unbalanced regional resilience to the economic crisis in Spain: a tale of specialisation and productivity," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 9(1), pages 153-178.
  • Handle: RePEc:oup:cjrecs:v:9:y:2016:i:1:p:153-178.
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1093/cjres/rsv034
    Download Restriction: Access to full text is restricted to subscribers.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. repec:sae:envira:v:50:y:2018:i:1:p:111-132 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Quah, Danny, 1993. "Empirical cross-section dynamics in economic growth," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(2-3), pages 426-434, April.
    3. Peter Havlik, 2005. "Structural Change, Productivity and Employment in the New EU Member States," wiiw Research Reports 313, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
    4. Rose, Andrew K. & Spiegel, Mark M., 2011. "Cross-country causes and consequences of the crisis: An update," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 55(3), pages 309-324, April.
    5. Peneder, Michael, 2003. "Industrial structure and aggregate growth," Structural Change and Economic Dynamics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 427-448, December.
    6. Stijn Claessens & Giovanni Dell'Ariccia & Deniz Igan & Luc Laeven, 2010. "Cross-country experiences and policy implications from the global financial crisis," Economic Policy, CEPR;CES;MSH, vol. 25, pages 267-293, April.
    7. Joaquin Maudos & Jose Manuel Pastor & Lorenzo Serrano, 2000. "Convergence in OECD countries: technical change, efficiency and productivity," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 32(6), pages 757-765.
    8. Marcello M. Estevão & Issouf Samaké, 2013. "The Economic Effects of Fiscal Consolidation with Debt Feedback," IMF Working Papers 13/136, International Monetary Fund.
    9. David Rosnick & Mark Weisbrot, 2013. "Policy Alternatives for a Return to Full Employment in Spain," CEPR Reports and Issue Briefs 2013-17, Center for Economic and Policy Research (CEPR).
    10. Chmelar, Ales, 2013. "Household Debt and the European Crisis," ECRI Papers 8239, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Lisa Gianmoena & Vicente Rios, 2018. "The Determinants of Resilience in European Regions During the Great Recession: a Bayesian Model Averaging Approach," Discussion Papers 2018/235, Dipartimento di Economia e Management (DEM), University of Pisa, Pisa, Italy.
    2. Celia Melguizo Cháfe & Vicente Royuela, 2017. "“What drives migration moves across urban areas in Spain?. Evidence from the Great Recession”," AQR Working Papers 201709, University of Barcelona, Regional Quantitative Analysis Group, revised Sep 2017.
    3. Murillo Huertas, Inés P. & Ramos, Raul & Simón, Hipólito, 2017. "Revisiting Interregional Wage Differentials: New Evidence from Spain with Matched Employer-Employee Data," IZA Discussion Papers 11122, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    4. Michael Stierle & Ulrike Stierle-von Schütz & Stijn Rocher, 2018. "How did Regional Economic Structures in the EU Change during the Economic Crisis?," European Economy - Discussion Papers 2015 - 088, Directorate General Economic and Financial Affairs (DG ECFIN), European Commission.
    5. Sébastien BOURDIN, 2018. "Géographie de la résilience des régions européennes face à la crise (2008-2013)," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 48, pages 53-70.
    6. Giovanni Marin & Marco Modica, 2019. "The Survival of Italian Individual Firms to Local Demand Shocks During the Great Recession," SEEDS Working Papers 0119, SEEDS, Sustainability Environmental Economics and Dynamics Studies, revised Jan 2019.
    7. repec:bla:jregsc:v:58:y:2018:i:4:p:837-863 is not listed on IDEAS
    8. Juan R. Cuadrado-Roura & Ron Martin & Andrés Rodríguez-Pose, 2016. "The economic crisis in Europe: urban and regional consequences," Cambridge Journal of Regions, Economy and Society, Cambridge Political Economy Society, vol. 9(1), pages 3-11.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:oup:cjrecs:v:9:y:2016:i:1:p:153-178.. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Oxford University Press). General contact details of provider: https://academic.oup.com/cjres .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.